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dc.contributor.authorEmmanuel, A
dc.contributor.authorByrne, J
dc.contributor.authorWilson, I
dc.contributor.authorBalfe, P
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-29T10:49:59Z
dc.date.available2012-02-29T10:49:59Z
dc.date.issued2011-10
dc.identifier.citationIs laparoscopic appendicectomy a safe procedure for trainees in the peripheral hospital setting? 2011, 104 (9):276-8 Ir Med J
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102
dc.identifier.pmid22132597
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/213510
dc.description.abstractLaparoscopic appendicectomy has become standard in the treatment of acute appendicitis in most hospitals in Ireland. Studies have shown that it is a safe procedure for trainees to perform. However, these studies were conducted in university teaching hospitals whereas a significant proportion of training in Ireland takes place in peripheral hospitals which provide a different training environment. The aim of this study was to determine whether laparoscopic appendicectomy is a safe procedure for surgical trainees to perform in a peripheral hospital setting. A retrospective analysis was performed of appendicectomies carried out at a peripheral hospital over a 12 month period. Comparisons were made between consultant surgeons and trainees for a variety of outcomes. Of 155 appendicectomies, 129 (83.2%) were performed laparoscopically, of which 10 (7.75%) were converted to open. Consultants performed 99 (77%) laparoscopic appendicectomies. There were no statistically significant differences between consultants and trainees in complication rates (19 (19.2%) vs. 4 (13.3%), p = 0.46), mean length of hospital stay (4.7 +/- 4.0 vs. 3.4 +/- 3.3 days, p = 0.13), or rate of conversion to open operation (9 (9.1%) vs. 1 (3.3%), p = 0.45). For cases of complicated appendicitis there were no significant differences between consultants and trainees in complication rates (12 vs. 2, p = 0.40) or length of hospital stay (6.4 +/- 3.9 vs. 4.7 +/- 5.6 days, p = 0.27). We conclude that laparoscopic appendicectomy is a safe procedure for trainees to perform in the peripheral hospital setting and should be incorporated into surgical training programs at an early stage of training.
dc.language.isoen
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshAppendectomy
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshGeneral Surgery
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshInternship and Residency
dc.subject.meshIreland
dc.subject.meshLaparoscopy
dc.subject.meshLength of Stay
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshPostoperative Complications
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies
dc.titleIs laparoscopic appendicectomy a safe procedure for trainees in the peripheral hospital setting?en
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, St Luke's Hospital, Freshford Road, Kilkenny. arhemmanuel@gmail.com
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journal
dc.type.qualificationlevelN/Aen
cr.approval.ethicalN/Aen
dc.description.provinceLeinster
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-22T16:06:13Z
html.description.abstractLaparoscopic appendicectomy has become standard in the treatment of acute appendicitis in most hospitals in Ireland. Studies have shown that it is a safe procedure for trainees to perform. However, these studies were conducted in university teaching hospitals whereas a significant proportion of training in Ireland takes place in peripheral hospitals which provide a different training environment. The aim of this study was to determine whether laparoscopic appendicectomy is a safe procedure for surgical trainees to perform in a peripheral hospital setting. A retrospective analysis was performed of appendicectomies carried out at a peripheral hospital over a 12 month period. Comparisons were made between consultant surgeons and trainees for a variety of outcomes. Of 155 appendicectomies, 129 (83.2%) were performed laparoscopically, of which 10 (7.75%) were converted to open. Consultants performed 99 (77%) laparoscopic appendicectomies. There were no statistically significant differences between consultants and trainees in complication rates (19 (19.2%) vs. 4 (13.3%), p = 0.46), mean length of hospital stay (4.7 +/- 4.0 vs. 3.4 +/- 3.3 days, p = 0.13), or rate of conversion to open operation (9 (9.1%) vs. 1 (3.3%), p = 0.45). For cases of complicated appendicitis there were no significant differences between consultants and trainees in complication rates (12 vs. 2, p = 0.40) or length of hospital stay (6.4 +/- 3.9 vs. 4.7 +/- 5.6 days, p = 0.27). We conclude that laparoscopic appendicectomy is a safe procedure for trainees to perform in the peripheral hospital setting and should be incorporated into surgical training programs at an early stage of training.


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