Ireland's central source for Open Access health research 


Lenus, the Irish Health Research repository is the leading source for Irish research in health and social care.  The Lenus collections include peer reviewed journal articles, grey literature, dissertations, reports and conference presentations. Lenus contains the publications of the Irish Health Service Executive (HSE) and the collected research output of over 130 health organisations past and present are all freely accessible. 

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If you are an Irish Researcher or have conducted research in an Irish Institution or Health Organisation you can add your published research to Lenus. Submitted articles must be available in Open Access format or the publishers policy permit author self archiving. Advice on Open Access publishing and publishers policies are available on the 'Open Access Publishing Guide' and 'publishers' policies' pages available on the left.     

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HSE Open Access Research Awards 2018 - Now Open for Entry

Aplications are now open for the annual HSE Open Access Research awards. If you have published in Open Access in the past 24 months you can now submit. Applications will be accepted until November 2nd and winners will be announced at the Open Access Awards ceremoney on December 7th       

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  • Children's nurse post-registration education programmes (2nd edition)

    Bord Altranais and Cnáimhseachais na hÉireann (Bord Altranais agus Cnáimhseachais na hÉireann, 2018)
  • Bridging the digital disconnect: exploring parents’ views on using Technology to Promote Young People’s Mental Health

    Clarke, Aleisha; Kuosmanen, Tuuli; Chambers, Derek; Barry, Margaret; Health Promotion Research Centre and Inspire Ireland (2013-09)
  • Placental FKBP51 mediates a link between second trimester maternal anxiety and birthweight in female infants.

    Togher, Katie L; O'Keeffe, Gerard W; Khashan, Ali S; Clarke, Gerard; Kenny, Louise C; Cork University Maternity Hospital and University College Cork (Scientific Reports, 2018-10-11)
    Prenatal distress is associated with adverse outcomes in affected offspring. Alterations in placental glucocorticoid signalling and subsequent foetal overexposure to glucocorticoids have been implicated as an underlying mechanism. Infant sex is emerging as an important factor in disease susceptibility. This study aimed to examine the effects of maternal distress across pregnancy on birth outcomes and placental glucocorticoid genes in a sex-dependent manner. Participants completed psychological distress questionnaires throughout pregnancy. Placental HSD11B2, NR3C1 and FKBP51 were analysed by real time PCR and cortisol was measured in new-born hair. Second trimester stress was negatively correlated with birthweight in males and positively correlated with placental NR3C1 mRNA in females. Second trimester anxiety was negatively correlated with birthweight and placental FKBP51 mRNA in females. In mediation analysis, placental FKBP51 mRNA expression was found to mediate the link between prenatal anxiety and birthweight. New-born cortisol was negatively correlated with second trimester anxiety and positively correlated with female placental FKBP51 mRNA levels. Again, FKBP51 mRNA was found to mediate the link between anxiety and new-born cortisol. These results highlight a role for FKBP51 in the placental response to prenatal distress in females. The precise role that placental FKBP51 has in foetal and infant development has not been extensively studied and warrants further investigations.

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