Ireland's central source for Open Access health research 

Lenus, the Irish Health Research repository is the leading source for Irish research in health and social care.  The Lenus collections include peer reviewed journal articles, grey literature, dissertations, reports and conference presentations. Lenus contains the publications of the Irish Health Service Executive (HSE) and the collected research output of over 130 health organisations past and present are all freely accessible. 

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If you are an Irish Researcher or have conducted research in an Irish Institution or Health Organisation you can add your published research to Lenus. Submitted articles must be available in Open Access format or the publishers policy permit author self archiving. Advice on Open Access publishing and publishers policies are available on the 'Open Access Publishing Guide' and 'publishers' policies' pages available on the left.     

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Winners of the HSE Open Access Research Awards 2018 

Thank You to everyone who submitted an entry to the annual HSE Open Access Research awards. Winners were announced at the awards ceremony held in Dr Steevens Library on December 7th. 

Overall Winner Ailbhe Spillane 'What are the physical and psychological health effects of suicide bereavement on family members? An observational and interview mixed-methods study in Ireland.'  

Category Winners 

Congratulations to all the winners of this years' awards.  

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  • The Burden of Severe Lactational Mastitis in Ireland from 2006 to 2015

    Cooney, F; Petty-Saphon, N; Department of Public Health, Dr Steevens' Hospital (irish Medical Journal, 2019-01-15)
  • A Case of Paget-Schroetter Syndrome in a Young Male After Lifting Weights

    Umana, E.; Elsherif, M.; Binchy, J. (Irish Medical Journal, 2019-02)
    Paget-Schroetter Syndrome (PSS) or effort thrombosis of the axillary-subclavian venous axis is a rare disease affecting healthy young adults which requires a high index of suspicion to diagnose. Management often requires not only anticoagulation but also thrombolysis with first rib resection to prevent recurrence and complications. We present a case of a 31-year-old male who presented to our emergency department with pain and swelling of his left upper limb. He was diagnosed with PSS and underwent; anticoagulation, catheter directed thrombolysis and planned for first rib resection.
  • Kicking off a Retropharyngeal Abscess

    Rana, A; Heffernen, L; Binchy, J (Irish Medical Journal, 2019-03)
    Retropharyngeal abscesses (RPA) are deep neck space infections that can pose an immediate life-threatening emergency, such as airway obstruction. [1] The potential space can become infected by bacteria spreading from a contiguous area [2] or direct inoculation from penetrating trauma. [3] Infection is often polymicrobial (most commonly group A beta-hemolytic streptococci). [4
  • Meconium Ileus in Two Irish Newborns: The Presenting Feature of Cystic Fibrosis

    Smith, A.; Ryan, E; O’Keeffe, D; O’Donovan, D. (Irish Medical Journal, 2019-03)
    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is the most common genetically inherited disease in Ireland1. Approximately 1/ 2,300 infants per year are born with CF in Ireland2. Newborn bloodspot screening (NBS) screening for CF was introduced to Ireland in 20113. NBS screening for CF is associated with improved lung function, nutritional status and increased survival into early adulthood4. Therefore early recognition and management of this chronic condition is vital to ensuring optimal patient management.
  • Ustekinumab-induced subacute cutaneous lupus.

    Tierney, Emma; Kirthi, Shivashini; Ramsay, Bart; Ahmad, Kashif (JAAD Case Reports, 2019-03-01)
    Drug-induced lupus erythematosus (DILE) is a lupus-like syndrome temporally related to continuous drug exposure. DILE can be divided into systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) and chronic cutaneous lupus.1 Hydrochlorothiazide was the first drug associated with SCLE in 1985,2 but at least 100 other agents have since been reported to induce/exacerbate SCLE, with terbinafine, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors, antiepileptics, and proton pump inhibitors, the most frequently associated medications. We present a case of ustekinumab-induced SCLE in a patient being treated for psoriasis.

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