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dc.contributor.authorOral Care Consulting (OCC) Ltd
dc.date.accessioned2009-11-05T11:21:05Z
dc.date.available2009-11-05T11:21:05Z
dc.date.issued2009-11-05T11:21:05Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/85398
dc.descriptionOral Care Consulting (OCC) Ltd was asked by the Department of Health and Children to produce a short report on the current status of probity assurance within the dental sector as undertaken by the Health Service Executive (HSE). OCC were specifically asked to summarise the recommendations of the two previous reports on probity in the DTSS; to provide greater clarity on the statements surrounding probity made in OCC’s report on the Public Dental Service of the Health Service Executive, and to advise on these consequences arising from the second term of reference and the possible nature of the financial risk exposure to overall DTSS expenditure. The first report (2002) concluded that there was a lack of information on the magnitude of existing problems in the DTSS arrangements. Shortcomings in the definition of standards in both clinical and non-clinical areas were apparent, accountability within the system was also poor and the arrangements that existed to deal with perceived breaches in probity were inadequate. The second report submitted in 2007 concluded that the HSE had made considerable progress following our recommendations to implement probity arrangements. In particular, many of the structural elements of a probity assurance system had been introduced including the establishment of an Examining Dentist scheme. The report identified a number of areas where further progress should be made over and above current performance. These would require resources both in terms of personnel and training. The recent report of the Public Dental Service (PDS) highlighted the role that the PDS could play in probity assurance with specific reference to estimating the value for money elements of the service’s work. However, due to other changes the level of probity assurance had declined, indeed was now substantially weaker when compared to the level found in 2007. Although few data exist, based on work in alternative care systems OCC estimate at least ten per cent of payments are likely to be inappropriate. However, to achieve even this figure would require a substantial commitment on the part of the HSE, which it has failed to show since 2007.en
dc.description.sponsorshipDepartment of Health and Children (DOHC)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOral Care Consulting (OCC) Ltden
dc.subjectDENTAL HEALTH CAREen
dc.subjectDENTAL HEALTHen
dc.titleA report on probity assurance within the dental care sectoren
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Health and Children (DOHC)en
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-30T22:14:00Z


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