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dc.contributor.authorNational Health Library & Knowledge Service (NHLKS)
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-12T13:50:16Z
dc.date.available2022-05-12T13:50:16Z
dc.date.issued2020-04-29
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/631894
dc.descriptionPatients with diabetes are considered to be at higher risk for severe illness. They are more likely to need intensive care if they develop COVID-19 compared with patients who do not have diabetes and have a higher case fatality rate10, 19. Diabetes may not increase the risk of COVID-19 infection but it can lead to enhanced disease severity. Preliminary findings from the United States14 suggest that persons with underlying health conditions or other recognized risk factors for severe outcomes from respiratory infections appear to be at a higher risk for severe disease from COVID-19 than are persons without these conditions. The most commonly reported conditions were diabetes mellitus, chronic lung disease and cardiovascular disease. The Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine5 states that there is little evidence on how people with diabetes can reduce their risk of COVID-19 infection beyond following general infection control guidance. Significant disruptions to routine care may also contribute to poorer outcomes during and following the pandemic. Hyperglycemia should not be overlooked, but adequately treated to improve the outcomes of COVID-19 patients with our without diabetes25. Both the HPSC1 and WHO3 highlight evidence suggesting there are two groups of people at a higher risk of acquiring a more severe disease; older people and those with an underlying medical condition such as diabetes. Clinical guidance from the CDC4 also highlights risk factors for severe illness and reports that fatality is higher for patients with diabetes. Diabetes as a distinctive comorbidity is associated with more severe disease, acute respiratory distress syndrome and increased mortality12. In a nationwide analysis on comorbidity and its impact on patients in China23, Guan et al found that the most prevalent comorbidity was hypertension followed by diabetes. The study concludes that patients with any comorbidity yielded poorer clinical outcomes than those without, and that a greater number of comorbidities also correlated with poorer clinical outcomes. Discussing two earlier CoV infections  SARS and MERS  Bloomgarden et al34 report that regardless of the potential for the spread of COVID-19, as with influenza- reported mortality diabetes is an important risk factor for adverse outcome. Diabetes should be considered a risk factor and more intensive attention should be paid to patients with diabetes, in case of rapid deterioration.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherHealth Service Executiveen_US
dc.subjectCORONAVIRUSen_US
dc.subjectCOVID-19en_US
dc.subjectDIABETES MELLITUSen_US
dc.titleWhat is the impact of diabetes mellitus among people infected with COVID-19? [v1.2]en_US
dc.typeOtheren_US
refterms.dateFOA2022-05-12T13:50:17Z


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