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dc.contributor.authorSchliemann, Désirée
dc.contributor.authorParamasivam, Darishiani
dc.contributor.authorDahlui, Maznah
dc.contributor.authorCardwell, Christopher R
dc.contributor.authorSomasundaram, Saunthari
dc.contributor.authorIbrahim Tamin, Nor Saleha Binti
dc.contributor.authorDonnelly, Conan
dc.contributor.authorSu, Tin Tin
dc.contributor.authorDonnelly, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-26T09:57:40Z
dc.date.available2021-07-26T09:57:40Z
dc.date.issued2020-03-25
dc.identifier.pmid32213173
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12885-020-06742-3
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/630005
dc.description.abstractBackground: Colorectal cancer (CRC) cases are detected late in Malaysia similar to most Asian countries. The Be Cancer Alert Campaign (BCAC) was a culturally adapted mass media campaign designed to improve CRC awareness and reduce late detection in Malaysia. The evaluation of the BCAC-CRC aimed to assess campaign reach, campaign impact and health service use. Methods: Participants aged ≥40 years (n = 730) from randomly selected households in Selangor State Malaysia, completed interview-based assessments. Campaign reach was assessed in terms of responses to an adapted questionnaire that was used in evaluations in other countries. The impact of the campaign was assessed in terms of awareness, confidence to detect symptoms and self-efficacy to discuss symptoms with a doctor as captured by the Cancer Awareness Measure (CAM). CAM was administered before-and-after campaign implementation and responses by BCAC recognisers (i.e. participants who recognised one or more of the BCAC television, radio or print advertisements when prompted) and non-recognisers (i.e. participants who did not recognise any of the BCAC advertisements) were compared analytically. Logistic regression analysed comparative differences in cancer awareness by socio-demographic characteristics and recognition of the BCAC materials. Results: Over 65% of participants (n = 484) recognised the BCAC-CRC. Campaign-recognisers were significantly more likely to be aware of each CRC symptom at follow-up and were more confident about noticing symptoms (46.9% vs 34.9%, p = 0.018) compared to non-recognisers. There was no difference between groups in terms of self-efficacy to see a doctor about symptoms. Improved symptoms awareness at follow-up was lower for Indians compared to Malays (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.53, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.34, 0.83, p = 0.005). Health service use data did not indicate an increase in screening activity during or immediately after the campaign months. Conclusion: Overall, the findings of the evaluation indicated that the culturally adapted, evidence-based mass media intervention improved CRC symptom awareness among the Malaysian population; and that impact is more likely when a campaign operates a differentiated approach that matches modes of communication to the ethnic and social diversity in a population.en
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectAwarenessen_US
dc.subjectBowel canceren_US
dc.subjectCampaignen_US
dc.subjectColonoscopyen_US
dc.subjectCOLORECTAL CANCERen_US
dc.subjectEffectivenessen_US
dc.subjectHEALTH PROMOTIONen_US
dc.subjectMalaysiaen_US
dc.subjectMass mediaen_US
dc.subjectRadioen_US
dc.subjectReachen_US
dc.subjectRecognitionen_US
dc.subjectsocial mediaen_US
dc.subjectTVen_US
dc.subjectiFOBTen_US
dc.titleChange in public awareness of colorectal cancer symptoms following the Be Cancer Alert Campaign in the multi-ethnic population of Malaysia.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2407
dc.identifier.journalBMC canceren_US
dc.source.journaltitleBMC cancer
dc.source.volume20
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage252
dc.source.endpage
refterms.dateFOA2021-07-26T09:57:41Z
dc.source.countryUnited Kingdom
dc.source.countryEngland


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