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dc.contributor.authorPallesen, Kirsten Siig
dc.contributor.authorRogers, Lisa
dc.contributor.authorAnjara, Sabrina
dc.contributor.authorDe Brún, Aoife
dc.contributor.authorMcAuliffe, Eilish
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-10T09:45:23Z
dc.date.available2021-06-10T09:45:23Z
dc.date.issued2020-01-30
dc.identifier.pmid31999883
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/hex.13002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/629663
dc.descriptionIntroduction: Co-design involves stakeholders as design partners to ensure a better fit to user needs. Many benefits of involving stakeholders in design processes have been proposed; however, few studies have evaluated participants' experience of co-design in the development of educational interventions. As part of a larger study, health-care professionals, researchers and patients co-designed a collective leadership intervention for health-care teams. This study evaluated their experiences of the co-design process. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with individuals (n = 10) who took part in the co-design workshops. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. Results: Four key themes were identified from the data: (a) Managing expectations in an open-ended process; (b) Establishing a positive team climate; (c) Focusing on frustrations-challenging but informative; and (d) Achieving a genuine co-design partnership. Conclusions: The development of a positive team climate is essential to the co-design process. Organizers should focus on building strong working relationships from the beginning to enable open discussion. Organizers of co-design should be conscious of establishing and maintaining a genuine partnership where participants are involved as equal partners and co-creators. This can be done through the continuous use of feedback to allow participants to influence the workshop directions, and through limiting researcher domination. Lastly, co-design can be daunting, but organizers can positively impact participants' experience by acknowledging the emergent nature of the process in order to reduce participant apprehension, thereby limiting the barriers to participation.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1111/hex.13002en_US
dc.rights© 2019 The Authors Health Expectations published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
dc.subjectCo-designen_US
dc.subjecthealth services researchen_US
dc.subjectImplementation scienceen_US
dc.subjectparticipatory designen_US
dc.subjectQualitative researchen_US
dc.subjectQuality improvementen_US
dc.subjectstakeholder participationen_US
dc.titleA qualitative evaluation of participants' experiences of using co-design to develop a collective leadership educational intervention for health-care teams.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US
dc.identifier.eissn1369-7625
dc.identifier.journalHealth expectations : an international journal of public participation in health care and health policyen_US
dc.source.journaltitleHealth expectations : an international journal of public participation in health care and health policy
dc.source.volume23
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpage358
dc.source.endpage367
dc.source.countryEngland


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