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dc.contributor.authorDrennan, Jonathan
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-26T14:12:59Z
dc.date.available2021-05-26T14:12:59Z
dc.date.issued2021-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/629498
dc.descriptionThis is the first study in Ireland to examine nurse staffing and related outcomes in the emergency care setting; this report has identified some promising outcomes for further analysis in examining the impact of the safe staffing framework in emergency care settings on patient outcomes, staff outcomes, and organisational factors, in addition to the challenges associated with the implementation of the Draft Framework. These challenges include the stabilisation of the workforce and the need for further longitudinal data collection and analysis to examine the long-term impact of the implementation of the safe staffing initiative. Despite the staffing adjustments arising from the NHpPP calculations being made during the latter part of data collection, some positive trends were emerging in the data, exemplified by the decline in agency use towards the end of the study period. Similarly, positive outcomes were evident when analysing the key patient outcomes of time to triage and patients’ leaving without being seen. The data demonstrated that the hospital which required the greatest adjustment in staffing levels recorded the greatest reduction in patients’ average time to triage and patients LWBS (a key indicator of safe staffing in emergency care) at Time 2, as opposed to hospitals which required a more modest staffing change. This study has highlighted that administrative data is a useful resource in the determination of staffing requirements, as well as in the examination of the impact of staffing changes within the ED, particularly over a longitudinal period. Overall, this study shows that the hospitals which had modest changes to staffing levels generally remained stable or showed slight improvements in outcomes, despite increasing patient presentations. However, the data clearly demonstrates that the hospital with the greatest staffing adjustment recorded the best outcomes, with trends indicating a stabilisation of workforce, reduced agency use, and improved outcomes for both patients and staff. The results of this study offer support for the implementation of the Draft Framework within the emergency care setting. Future programmes of research can build on the insights and learning of this study in assessing emergency department outcomes over time in relation to staffing levels and skill mix.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherUniversity College Corken_US
dc.subjectNURSINGen_US
dc.subjectEMERGENCY MEDICAL CAREen_US
dc.subjectSTAFFINGen_US
dc.subjectSKILL MIXen_US
dc.subjectBURNOUTen_US
dc.subjectOCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETYen_US
dc.subjectPATIENT SAFETYen_US
dc.titleEvaluation of the Pilot Implementation of the Framework for Safe Nurse Staffing and Skill-Mix in Emergency Care Settingsen_US
dc.typeReporten_US
refterms.dateFOA2021-05-26T14:12:59Z


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