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dc.contributor.authorMills, Susan
dc.contributor.authorLane, Jonathan A
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Graeme J
dc.contributor.authorGrimaldi, Keith A
dc.contributor.authorRoss, R Paul
dc.contributor.authorStanton, Catherine
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-31T12:53:56Z
dc.date.available2020-01-31T12:53:56Z
dc.date.issued2019-06-27
dc.identifier.pmid31252674
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/nu11071468
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/627113
dc.descriptionModulation of the human gut microbiota through probiotics, prebiotics and dietary fibre are recognised strategies to improve health and prevent disease. Yet we are only beginning to understand the impact of these interventions on the gut microbiota and the physiological consequences for the human host, thus forging the way towards evidence-based scientific validation. However, in many studies a percentage of participants can be defined as 'non-responders' and scientists are beginning to unravel what differentiates these from 'responders;' and it is now clear that an individual's baseline microbiota can influence an individual's response. Thus, microbiome composition can potentially serve as a biomarker to predict responsiveness to interventions, diets and dietary components enabling greater opportunities for its use towards disease prevention and health promotion. In Part I of this two-part review, we reviewed the current state of the science in terms of the gut microbiota and the role of diet and dietary components in shaping it and subsequent consequences for human health. In Part II, we examine the efficacy of gut-microbiota modulating therapies at different life stages and their potential to aid in the management of undernutrition and overnutrition. Given the significance of an individual's gut microbiota, we investigate the feasibility of microbiome testing and we discuss guidelines for evaluating the scientific validity of evidence for providing personalised microbiome-based dietary advice. Overall, this review highlights the potential value of the microbiome to prevent disease and maintain or promote health and in doing so, paves the pathway towards commercialisation.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectgeneticsen_US
dc.subjectguten_US
dc.subjectgut microbiomeen_US
dc.subjectimmunityen_US
dc.subjectmetabolic diseaseen_US
dc.subjectpersonalised nutritionen_US
dc.subjectprebioticsen_US
dc.subjectprecision nutritionen_US
dc.subjectprobioticsen_US
dc.titlePrecision Nutrition and the Microbiome Part II: Potential Opportunities and Pathways to Commercialisation.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn2072-6643
dc.identifier.journalNutrientsen_US
dc.source.journaltitleNutrients
dc.source.volume11
dc.source.issue7
refterms.dateFOA2020-01-31T12:53:58Z
dc.source.countrySwitzerland


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