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dc.contributor.authorO'Reilly, Martina
dc.contributor.authorLarkin, Philip
dc.contributor.authorConroy, Marian
dc.contributor.authorTwomey, Feargal
dc.contributor.authorLucey, Micheal
dc.contributor.authorDunne, Colum
dc.contributor.authorMeagher, David J
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-20T13:53:32Z
dc.date.available2017-06-20T13:53:32Z
dc.date.issued2016-07
dc.identifier.citationThe Impact of a Novel Tool for Comprehensive Assessment of Palliative Care (MPCAT) on Assessment Outcome at 6- and 12-Month Follow-Up. 2016, 52 (1):107-16 J Pain Symptom Manageen
dc.identifier.issn1873-6513
dc.identifier.pmid27233135
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2015.12.343
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/621439
dc.descriptionAbstract CONTEXT: Assessment in palliative care settings should be focused, sensitive, specific, and effective to minimize discomfort to vulnerable and often highly morbid patients. This report describes the development of an admission assessment protocol for a Specialist Palliative Care Inpatient Unit and its implementation into clinical practice. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to develop and investigate the impact of the implementation of a Specialist Palliative Care admission assessment tool on documentation of key patient needs. METHODS: The outcome of a systematic literature review was used to develop an admission assessment protocol (the intervention) in a Specialist Palliative Care Inpatient Unit. Mixed methods were used to facilitate a comprehensive evaluation pre- and post-intervention to test the effectiveness, feasibility, and acceptability of the intervention. RESULTS: The documented evidence of pain assessment improved from a baseline rate of 71% to 100% post-intervention. This improvement was maintained 12 months post-introduction of the tool (P < 0.001). The documented evidence of screening for spiritual distress increased from a baseline rate of 23% to 70% at 6 months and to 82% at 12 months (P < 0.001). The number of referrals made in the first 24 hours after assessment increased post-intervention (physiotherapy, P = 0.001; occupational therapy, P = 0.001; social work, P = 0.005; pastoral care, P = 0.005); this was maintained at 12 months. Significantly, more clinicians (88%) agreed that palliative care domains were comprehensively assessed post-intervention in comparison with 59% pre-intervention (P = 0.01). CONCLUSION: Introducing the Milford Palliative Care Assessment Tool was associated with significant improvement in assessment of multiple important aspects of patient need.en
dc.description.abstractAssessment in palliative care settings should be focused, sensitive, specific, and effective to minimize discomfort to vulnerable and often highly morbid patients. This report describes the development of an admission assessment protocol for a Specialist Palliative Care Inpatient Unit and its implementation into clinical practice.
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to develop and investigate the impact of the implementation of a Specialist Palliative Care admission assessment tool on documentation of key patient needs.
dc.description.abstractThe outcome of a systematic literature review was used to develop an admission assessment protocol (the intervention) in a Specialist Palliative Care Inpatient Unit. Mixed methods were used to facilitate a comprehensive evaluation pre- and post-intervention to test the effectiveness, feasibility, and acceptability of the intervention.
dc.description.abstractThe documented evidence of pain assessment improved from a baseline rate of 71% to 100% post-intervention. This improvement was maintained 12 months post-introduction of the tool (P < 0.001). The documented evidence of screening for spiritual distress increased from a baseline rate of 23% to 70% at 6 months and to 82% at 12 months (P < 0.001). The number of referrals made in the first 24 hours after assessment increased post-intervention (physiotherapy, P = 0.001; occupational therapy, P = 0.001; social work, P = 0.005; pastoral care, P = 0.005); this was maintained at 12 months. Significantly, more clinicians (88%) agreed that palliative care domains were comprehensively assessed post-intervention in comparison with 59% pre-intervention (P = 0.01).
dc.description.abstractIntroducing the Milford Palliative Care Assessment Tool was associated with significant improvement in assessment of multiple important aspects of patient need.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of pain and symptom managementen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectPALLIATIVE CAREen
dc.subjectASSESSMENTen
dc.subjectPAINen
dc.titleThe Impact of a Novel Tool for Comprehensive Assessment of Palliative Care (MPCAT) on Assessment Outcome at 6- and 12-Month Follow-Up.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMilford Care Centre; University College Dublin; University of Limericken
dc.identifier.journalJournal of pain and symptom managementen
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-27T22:00:56Z
html.description.abstractAssessment in palliative care settings should be focused, sensitive, specific, and effective to minimize discomfort to vulnerable and often highly morbid patients. This report describes the development of an admission assessment protocol for a Specialist Palliative Care Inpatient Unit and its implementation into clinical practice.
html.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to develop and investigate the impact of the implementation of a Specialist Palliative Care admission assessment tool on documentation of key patient needs.
html.description.abstractThe outcome of a systematic literature review was used to develop an admission assessment protocol (the intervention) in a Specialist Palliative Care Inpatient Unit. Mixed methods were used to facilitate a comprehensive evaluation pre- and post-intervention to test the effectiveness, feasibility, and acceptability of the intervention.
html.description.abstractThe documented evidence of pain assessment improved from a baseline rate of 71% to 100% post-intervention. This improvement was maintained 12 months post-introduction of the tool (P < 0.001). The documented evidence of screening for spiritual distress increased from a baseline rate of 23% to 70% at 6 months and to 82% at 12 months (P < 0.001). The number of referrals made in the first 24 hours after assessment increased post-intervention (physiotherapy, P = 0.001; occupational therapy, P = 0.001; social work, P = 0.005; pastoral care, P = 0.005); this was maintained at 12 months. Significantly, more clinicians (88%) agreed that palliative care domains were comprehensively assessed post-intervention in comparison with 59% pre-intervention (P = 0.01).
html.description.abstractIntroducing the Milford Palliative Care Assessment Tool was associated with significant improvement in assessment of multiple important aspects of patient need.


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Archived with thanks to Journal of pain and symptom management
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Archived with thanks to Journal of pain and symptom management