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dc.contributor.authorSuen, K-F K
dc.contributor.authorO’Neill, D
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-26T08:22:54Z
dc.date.available2017-05-26T08:22:54Z
dc.date.issued2017-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/621389
dc.descriptionThe publication of the initial Sláinte agus Tiomáint: Medical Fitness to Drive Guidelines in 2013 focussed the attention of Irish doctors on traffic medicine and the challenges of balancing mobility and safety with acute chronic medical conditions1. One condition receiving increasing attention is attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and attendant risk when driving. This assumes greater relevance in the light of increasing numbers of those whose symptoms persist into adult life. It used to be assumed that ADHD was a childhood disorder whose symptoms and prevalence would mitigate exponentially with chronological age2. However, the persistence rate of full diagnosis up to an age of 25 is found to be about 15%, rising up to 65% if including partial remission3. The adult prevalence of ADHD lies within the range of 2.5-4.2%.4 A complex interplay of cognitive, motor and emotional changes underlie the increased crash risk of drivers with ADHD5 estimated at relative risk of traffic crashes of 1.36.6 Co-morbidities, including oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and conduct disorder (CD), are common with ADHD and previous higher estimates of risk may have arisen from the presence of co-morbid ODD and/or CD6en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Medical Journalen
dc.subjectATTENTION DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDERen
dc.subjectDRIVINGen
dc.titleAdult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and driving – risk, medication and fitness to driveen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIrish Medical Journalen


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