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dc.contributor.authorRyan, J
dc.contributor.authorShields, G
dc.contributor.authorFinegan, E
dc.contributor.authorMoughty, A
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-21T13:52:06Z
dc.date.available2017-04-21T13:52:06Z
dc.date.issued2017-04
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/621280
dc.description.abstractPneumocephalus is defined as the presence of intracranial air. This is most commonly secondary to a traumatic head injury. Tension pneumocephalus presents radiologically with compression of the frontal lobes and widening of the interhemispheric space between the frontal lobes. It is often termed the Mount Fuji sign due to a perceived similarity with an iconic mountain peak in Japan. We present the case of a 52-year-old gentleman who presented to the emergency department shortly before 8am on a Saturday morning following an assault. He was alert and ambulatory with no clinical evidence of raised intracranial pressure. A plain radiograph of the facial bones showed significant pneumocephalus. A later CT was consistent with a tension pneumocephalus which usually necessitates urgent decompression.The patient showed no clinical signs or symptoms of raised intracranial pressure and was managed conservatively. He was discharged home 16 days later with no neurological deficit
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Medical Journalen
dc.subjectHEAD INJURYen
dc.subjectEMERGENCY DEPARTMENTSen
dc.titlePost Traumatic Tension Pneumocephalus: The Mount Fuji Signen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIrish Medical Journalen
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen
html.description.abstractPneumocephalus is defined as the presence of intracranial air. This is most commonly secondary to a traumatic head injury. Tension pneumocephalus presents radiologically with compression of the frontal lobes and widening of the interhemispheric space between the frontal lobes. It is often termed the Mount Fuji sign due to a perceived similarity with an iconic mountain peak in Japan. We present the case of a 52-year-old gentleman who presented to the emergency department shortly before 8am on a Saturday morning following an assault. He was alert and ambulatory with no clinical evidence of raised intracranial pressure. A plain radiograph of the facial bones showed significant pneumocephalus. A later CT was consistent with a tension pneumocephalus which usually necessitates urgent decompression.The patient showed no clinical signs or symptoms of raised intracranial pressure and was managed conservatively. He was discharged home 16 days later with no neurological deficit


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