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dc.contributor.authorTwomey, Anne
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-17T16:52:18Z
dc.date.available2017-02-17T16:52:18Z
dc.date.issued2017-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/621070
dc.descriptionThere are approximately 27,000 patients living in nursing homes in Ireland at present. These are probably our most vulnerable citizens with limited control over their daily lives. The trend over the past five years is for people to be cared for in their own homes by a combination of home help and family for longer. When their dependency reaches a level where this is insufficient, a nursing home is deemed to be the best living situation for them. Therefore, the type of patient I am now seeing in nursing homes is frailer and older than previously. Along with this, these older, frailer patients are increasingly dentate, with huge unmet dental health needs. These patients are high dependency and have poor access to quality oral hygiene and preventive measures. Administering dental treatment to these patients is fraught with difficulty. The xerostomia-inducing medications and fortified food supplements that are almost the norm for these patients are pushing their oral health further into the abyss.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Dental Associationen
dc.subjectDENTAL HEALTH CAREen
dc.subjectNURSING HOMESen
dc.subjectOLDER PEOPLEen
dc.titleThis is dental care for the elderly: Ireland 2016en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Irish Dental Associationen
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-27T19:11:44Z


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