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dc.contributor.authorHealth Service Executive (HSE)
dc.contributor.authorHSE Tobacco Free Ireland Programme
dc.contributor.authorNational Centre for Smoking Cessation and Training UK (NCSCT)
dc.contributor.authorRobson, Deborah
dc.contributor.authorPotts, Jennifer
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-17T09:47:36Z
dc.date.available2017-01-17T09:47:36Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.isbn9781786020130
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/621014
dc.descriptionReducing the burden of disease and disability caused by tobacco use was identified as a priority for the health services in 2010 with the publication of the HSE’s first framework for tobacco control. The approach we have taken to address this significant public health issue is aligned with the Healthy Ireland Framework (2013) and the Tobacco Free Ireland Policy (2013). The leadership shown by the HSE over the past five years has seen great progress in the delivery of this comprehensive and challenging 61 point action plan. Key to this progress has been the determined efforts and leadership of the National Implementation Group, matched by the support and engagement of our highly committed staff working across our services. Significant achievements during this time include – • development of policies for tobacco free campuses and protection of staff from exposure to second-hand smoke in domestic settings in 2012; • an award winning and sustained QUIT social marketing campaign launched in 2011; • significant numbers of frontline staff trained in our nationally accredited programme in brief intervention for smoking cessation; • implementation of a standardised intensive cessation support programme in 2012 with in excess of 40,000 smokers receiving support to date; • commissioning and publication of research to inform policy and practice; • active enforcement of tobacco control legislation: • the establishment of an engaged and supportive external stakeholder network. The Tobacco Free Campus Policy (2012) is the cornerstone of the HSEs’ Tobacco Free Ireland Programme. The policy contributes to changing social norms around tobacco use and ensures we treat tobacco addiction as a healthcare issue by systematically advising and supporting people to quit smoking. A phased approach has been taken for the roll-out of the policy across the health service. All acute hospitals, primary care sites and administrative sites are now tobacco free. Introduction of the policy has been supported by a suite of tools and resources developed for managers and staff, in addition to support and guidance from the National Tobacco Free Campus coordinator and Health Promotion and Improvement staff. Implementation is now underway across Social Care, Mental Health Services and TUSLA child and adolescent services.This briefing document is a tailored resource produced for Mental Health Services in recognition of the unique challenges arising from established practices and misconceptions around mental health and smoking. It is a valuable reference for staff in these services to support and guide them in their day-to-day interactions with clients and service users. The resource challenges myths and emphasises the crucial role staff play in reducing tobacco prevalence. This resource works alongside The Tobacco Free Campus Implementation Guide, a comprehensive suite of additional generic tools and resources to support smooth implementation of the policy. Reaching our goal of a Tobacco Free Ireland (smoking rates at less than 5%) by 2025 is an ambitious endeavour; however with a multi-pronged approach based on the World Health Organisation’s MPOWER principles and a consistent approach to tobacco management across all health services we can undoubtedly make a huge contribution to this goal. We now have compelling evidence that the comprehensive, multi-faceted and sustained efforts by the health service, by community and voluntary partners, by Government through fiscal policy and public health legislation is helping to reduce smoking rates in Ireland. The 2015 Healthy Ireland Survey reported daily smoking prevalence among adults at 19%, down from 24% in 2007. In addition youth rates have also dropped from 12% to 8% between 2010 and 2014 according to the latest Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children Survey. The HSE is committed to playing its part and we look forward to working collaboratively with colleagues in the Mental Health Division, the Health and Wellbeing Division’s Health Promotion and Improvement service, and in Community Healthcare Organisations and Hospital Groups to support delivery on this significant health agenda.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHealth Service Executive (HSE)en
dc.subjectHEALTH PROMOTIONen
dc.subjectSMOKINGen
dc.subjectSMOKING CESSATIONen
dc.subjectMENTAL HEALTHen
dc.titleSmoking cessation and mental health: A briefing for front-line staffen
dc.typeReporten
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-27T18:40:00Z


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