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dc.contributor.authorDocherty, C
dc.contributor.authorLester, L
dc.contributor.authorO’Reilly, S
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-21T11:30:25Z
dc.date.available2016-10-21T11:30:25Z
dc.date.issued2016-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/620859
dc.description.abstractPalliative care (PC) positively impacts patient outcomes, decreases hospital admissions and improves quality of life. Despite evidence, PC resources are reported as under-utilised. Few studies have explored patient attitudes towards PC. This study evaluated patient attitudes towards PC. It was a prospective study conducted in oncology outpatient clinics. A 26-item questionnaire was distributed to those with metastatic cancer (N = 44). Sixty percent believed PC can make people ‘feel better’, 63.4% believed PC is offered when nothing more can be done. Most were unsure or disagreed that opioids are addictive. Eighty percent reported symptom control is more important than prolonging life. Sixty-one percent strongly agreed or agreed that ‘losing hope makes people die sooner’. Although PC was deemed beneficial, a significant relationship exists between familiarity with PC and thinking it’s offered when ‘nothing more can be done’. Lack of knowledge about opioids, preference for symptom control over life prolonging measures and the importance of hope were also emphasised.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Medical Journalen
dc.relation.urlhttp://imj.ie/imj-may2016-volume-109-number-5/en
dc.subjectCANCERen
dc.subjectPALLIATIVE CAREen
dc.subjectPATIENT ATTITUDESen
dc.titleAttitudes toward Palliative Care and End of Life Issues: A Prospective Survey in Patients with Metastatic Canceren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIrish Medical Journalen
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceMunsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen
html.description.abstractPalliative care (PC) positively impacts patient outcomes, decreases hospital admissions and improves quality of life. Despite evidence, PC resources are reported as under-utilised. Few studies have explored patient attitudes towards PC. This study evaluated patient attitudes towards PC. It was a prospective study conducted in oncology outpatient clinics. A 26-item questionnaire was distributed to those with metastatic cancer (N = 44). Sixty percent believed PC can make people ‘feel better’, 63.4% believed PC is offered when nothing more can be done. Most were unsure or disagreed that opioids are addictive. Eighty percent reported symptom control is more important than prolonging life. Sixty-one percent strongly agreed or agreed that ‘losing hope makes people die sooner’. Although PC was deemed beneficial, a significant relationship exists between familiarity with PC and thinking it’s offered when ‘nothing more can be done’. Lack of knowledge about opioids, preference for symptom control over life prolonging measures and the importance of hope were also emphasised.


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