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dc.contributor.authorNicholson, Alf*
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-21T11:04:28Z
dc.date.available2016-09-21T11:04:28Z
dc.date.issued2016-04
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/620611
dc.description.abstractAbusive head trauma (previously referred to as Shaken Baby Syndrome) consists of a triad of findings which included subdural haemorrhage, retinal haemorrhages and encephalopathy after receiving a shake injury or blunt trauma to the head. Debate rages regarding the exact mechanism. Previously published reports on abusive head trauma (AHT) highlight the young age of the victims (median 4 months of age), the significant preponderance of male infants (3:1 in most series), the high rate of probable male perpetrators (just over 50%), and relatively high rates of mortality and morbidity
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Medical Journalen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.imj.ieen
dc.subject.otherSHAKEN BABY SYNDROMEen
dc.titleRecognition and management of Shaken Baby Syndromeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIrish Medical Journalen
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen
html.description.abstractAbusive head trauma (previously referred to as Shaken Baby Syndrome) consists of a triad of findings which included subdural haemorrhage, retinal haemorrhages and encephalopathy after receiving a shake injury or blunt trauma to the head. Debate rages regarding the exact mechanism. Previously published reports on abusive head trauma (AHT) highlight the young age of the victims (median 4 months of age), the significant preponderance of male infants (3:1 in most series), the high rate of probable male perpetrators (just over 50%), and relatively high rates of mortality and morbidity


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