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dc.contributor.authorKelly, Brendan
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-03T14:48:26Z
dc.date.available2016-08-03T14:48:26Z
dc.date.issued2016-03-01
dc.identifier.citationKelly, B (2016) "Report of the Expert Group on the review of the Mental Health Act 2001: what does it mean for social workers?" The Irish Social Worker Spring 2016, (p. 41-44).en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/617870
dc.descriptionInvoluntary psychiatric admission and treatment in Ireland is governed by the Mental Health Act 2001. In 2015, the Report of the Expert Group on the Review of the Mental Health Act 2001 proposed 165 reforms which, if implemented, will bring substantial changes to psychiatric care in Ireland. The present article focuses on involuntary psychiatric admission and treatment, and outlines (a) current law governing this area; (b) general reforms proposed by the Report of the Expert Group on the Review of the Mental Health Act 2001; and (c) some of the proposed changes that specifically affect social workers, including developing the role of authorised officers, and enhancing requirements for multi-disciplinary input to certain decisions regarding involuntary admission and treatment. This period of reform offers valuable opportunities for social workers and others to help further protect and promote the rights of the mentally ill.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Association of Social Workersen
dc.subjectMENTAL HEALTHen
dc.subjectMENTAL AND BEHAVIOURAL DISORDERen
dc.subjectLEGISLATIONen
dc.subjectSOCIAL WORKen
dc.titleReport of the Expert Group on the review of the Mental Health Act 2001: what does it mean for social workers?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentProfessor of Psychiatry at Trinity College Dublinen
dc.identifier.journalThe Irish Social Workeren
refterms.dateFOA2016-09-01T00:00:00Z


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