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dc.contributor.authorO’Morain, Padraig
dc.contributor.authorLeahy, Ann
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-10T09:15:12Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-10T09:15:12Zen
dc.date.issued2007en
dc.identifier.isbn1 900578 61 1en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/559427en
dc.descriptionA programme which has enhanced the lives of older people living in care centres in the Midlands could be said to have originated in a theatre in Portlaoise on 6 June, 2000. On that day, a conference entitled Creative Change for the Older Person in the Residential Setting was held in the Dunamaise Theatre. Forty minutes before it was due to begin, Elly McCrea, one of those involved in organising the conference, feared nobody was going to turn up. Was the proposal to introduce an arts and drama programme to the Midland Health Board’s nine care centres for older people about to die from lack of interest? But forty minutes later, the theatre was full. Directors of Nursing, health administrators, care staff, residents and other interested parties gave the proposal a warm and immediate welcome. The conference itself had its origins in a 1998 award given to Age & Opportunity by Allied Irish Bank under its AIB Better Ireland Award scheme. Age & Opportunity won the award for its work in the arts, specifically for its nationwide Bealtaine arts festival which takes place each May. Involvement by older people in the arts, to improve their quality of life and to combat ageist stereotypes, is a keystone of the work of Age & Opportunity. Through its work on Bealtaine, Age & Opportunity staff had seen how participation in an arts programme could improve quality of life of older people. However, they also knew that people living in care were often excluded from quality arts experiences. The organisation decided to use the £5,000 award to develop an arts programme for older people in care settings and to pilot it in one health board area – the Midland. Elly McCrea was retained as an arts consultant and asked to carry out a needs sensing exercise. Elly visited care centres, spoke to managers, staff and residents and was very struck by the rows of people passively sitting with their backs to the wall with little or no stimulation. The challenge was to come up with a programme that would provide ‘positive and regular stimulation to counteract institutionalisation.’en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectOLDER PEOPLEen
dc.subjectART THERAPYen
dc.subjectRESIDENTIAL CAREen
dc.subjectQUALITY OF LIFEen
dc.titleCreative exchanges: using the arts to transform the experience of residents and staff in care centres for older peopleen
dc.typeReporten
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-26T23:59:13Z


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