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dc.contributor.authorHutchinson, Michael
dc.contributor.authorFox, Robert J
dc.contributor.authorMiller, David H
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, J Theodore
dc.contributor.authorKita, Mariko
dc.contributor.authorHavrdova, Eva
dc.contributor.authorO'Gorman, John
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Ray
dc.contributor.authorNovas, Mark
dc.contributor.authorViglietta, Vissia
dc.contributor.authorDawson, Katherine T
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-06T10:52:06Z
dc.date.available2014-08-06T10:52:06Z
dc.date.issued2013-09
dc.identifier.citationHutchinson M et al. Clinical efficacy of BG-12 (dimethyl fumarate) in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: subgroup analyses of the CONFIRM study. 2013, 260 (9):2286-96 J. Neurol.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1432-1459
dc.identifier.pmid23749293
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00415-013-6968-1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/324322
dc.description.abstractIn the phase 3, randomized, placebo-controlled and active reference (glatiramer acetate) comparator CONFIRM study in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, oral BG-12 (dimethyl fumarate) reduced the annualized relapse rate (ARR; primary endpoint), as well as the proportion of patients relapsed, magnetic resonance imaging lesion activity, and confirmed disability progression, compared with placebo. We investigated the clinical efficacy of BG-12 240 mg twice daily (BID) and three times daily (TID) in patient subgroups stratified according to baseline demographic and disease characteristics including gender, age, relapse history, McDonald criteria, treatment history, Expanded Disability Status Scale score, T2 lesion volume, and gadolinium-enhancing lesions. BG-12 treatment demonstrated generally consistent benefits on relapse-related outcomes across patient subgroups, reflecting the positive findings in the overall CONFIRM study population. Treatment with BG-12 BID and TID reduced the ARR and the proportion of patients relapsed at 2 years compared with placebo in all subgroups analyzed. Reductions in ARR with BG-12 BID versus placebo ranged from 34% [rate ratio 0.664 (95% confidence interval 0.422-1.043)] to 53% [0.466 (0.313-0.694)] and from 13% [0.870 (0.551-1.373)] to 67% [0.334 (0.226-0.493)] with BG-12 TID versus placebo. Treatment with glatiramer acetate reduced the ARR and the proportion of patients relapsed at 2 years compared with placebo in most patient subgroups. The results of these analyses indicate that treatment with BG-12 is effective on relapses across a broad range of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis with varied demographic and disease characteristics.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00415-013-6968-1en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of neurologyen_GB
dc.subjectMULTIPLE SCLEROSISen_GB
dc.subjectTHERAPYen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshDisease Progression
dc.subject.meshDose-Response Relationship, Drug
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshFumarates
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshImmunosuppressive Agents
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMultiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting
dc.subject.meshPeptides
dc.subject.meshRecurrence
dc.titleClinical efficacy of BG-12 (dimethyl fumarate) in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: subgroup analyses of the CONFIRM study.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department1. St. Vincent’s University Hospital, Elm Park, Donnybrook, Dublin 4, Ireland 2. The Mellen Center for Multiple Sclerosis Treatment and Research, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA 3. NMR Research Unit, Department of Neuroinflammation, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK 4. Multiple Sclerosis Program, Baylor Institute for Immunology Research, Dallas, TX, USA 6. Department of Neurology, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic 7. Biogen Idec Inc., Weston, MA, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of neurologyen_GB
dc.description.fundingOtheren
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen
html.description.abstractIn the phase 3, randomized, placebo-controlled and active reference (glatiramer acetate) comparator CONFIRM study in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, oral BG-12 (dimethyl fumarate) reduced the annualized relapse rate (ARR; primary endpoint), as well as the proportion of patients relapsed, magnetic resonance imaging lesion activity, and confirmed disability progression, compared with placebo. We investigated the clinical efficacy of BG-12 240 mg twice daily (BID) and three times daily (TID) in patient subgroups stratified according to baseline demographic and disease characteristics including gender, age, relapse history, McDonald criteria, treatment history, Expanded Disability Status Scale score, T2 lesion volume, and gadolinium-enhancing lesions. BG-12 treatment demonstrated generally consistent benefits on relapse-related outcomes across patient subgroups, reflecting the positive findings in the overall CONFIRM study population. Treatment with BG-12 BID and TID reduced the ARR and the proportion of patients relapsed at 2 years compared with placebo in all subgroups analyzed. Reductions in ARR with BG-12 BID versus placebo ranged from 34% [rate ratio 0.664 (95% confidence interval 0.422-1.043)] to 53% [0.466 (0.313-0.694)] and from 13% [0.870 (0.551-1.373)] to 67% [0.334 (0.226-0.493)] with BG-12 TID versus placebo. Treatment with glatiramer acetate reduced the ARR and the proportion of patients relapsed at 2 years compared with placebo in most patient subgroups. The results of these analyses indicate that treatment with BG-12 is effective on relapses across a broad range of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis with varied demographic and disease characteristics.


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