Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMcDonnell, R J
dc.contributor.authorRampling, A
dc.contributor.authorCrook, S
dc.contributor.authorCockcroft, P M
dc.contributor.authorWilshaw, G A
dc.contributor.authorCheasty, T
dc.contributor.authorStuart, J
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-31T13:23:50Z
dc.date.available2014-07-31T13:23:50Z
dc.date.issued1997-12-12
dc.identifier.citationMcDonnell RJ et al. An outbreak of Vero cytotoxin producing Escherichia coli O157 infection associated with takeaway sandwiches. Commun Dis Rep CDR Rev. 1997, 7 (13):R201-5en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1350-9349
dc.identifier.pmid9447785
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/324049
dc.descriptionAn outbreak of food poisoning due to Escherichia coli O157 phage type 2 Vero cytotoxin 2 affected 26 people in southern counties of England in May and June 1995. The organism was isolated from faecal specimens from 23 patients, 16 of whom lived in Dorset and seven in Hampshire. Isolates were indistinguishable by phage typing, Vero cytotoxin gene typing, restriction fragment length polymorphism, and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Three associated cases, linked epidemiologically to the outbreak, were confirmed serologically by detection of antibodies to E. coli O157 lipopolysaccharide. Twenty-two of the 26 patients were adults: four were admitted to hospital with haemorrhagic colitis. Four cases were children: two were admitted to hospital with haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS). There were no deaths. Although E. coli O157 was not isolated from any food samples, illness was associated with having eaten cold meats in sandwiches bought from two sandwich producers, in Weymouth and in Portsmouth. Both shops were supplied by the same wholesaler, who kept no records and obtained cooked meats from several sources in packs that did not carry adequate identification marks. It was, therefore, impossible to trace back to the original producer or to investigate further to determine the origin of contamination with E. coli O157. To protect the public health it is essential that all wholesale packs of ready-to-eat food carry date codes and the producer's identification mark. Detailed record keeping should be part of hazard analysis critical control point (HACCP) systems and should be maintained throughout the chain of distribution from the producer to retail outlets.en_GB
dc.description.abstractAn outbreak of food poisoning due to Escherichia coli O157 phage type 2 Vero cytotoxin 2 affected 26 people in southern counties of England in May and June 1995. The organism was isolated from faecal specimens from 23 patients, 16 of whom lived in Dorset and seven in Hampshire. Isolates were indistinguishable by phage typing, Vero cytotoxin gene typing, restriction fragment length polymorphism, and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Three associated cases, linked epidemiologically to the outbreak, were confirmed serologically by detection of antibodies to E. coli O157 lipopolysaccharide. Twenty-two of the 26 patients were adults: four were admitted to hospital with haemorrhagic colitis. Four cases were children: two were admitted to hospital with haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS). There were no deaths. Although E. coli O157 was not isolated from any food samples, illness was associated with having eaten cold meats in sandwiches bought from two sandwich producers, in Weymouth and in Portsmouth. Both shops were supplied by the same wholesaler, who kept no records and obtained cooked meats from several sources in packs that did not carry adequate identification marks. It was, therefore, impossible to trace back to the original producer or to investigate further to determine the origin of contamination with E. coli O157. To protect the public health it is essential that all wholesale packs of ready-to-eat food carry date codes and the producer's identification mark. Detailed record keeping should be part of hazard analysis critical control point (HACCP) systems and should be maintained throughout the chain of distribution from the producer to retail outlets.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9447785en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Communicable disease report. CDR reviewen_GB
dc.subjectFOOD SAFETYen_GB
dc.subjectFOOD POISONINGen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshAged
dc.subject.meshBacterial Toxins
dc.subject.meshChild
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool
dc.subject.meshCluster Analysis
dc.subject.meshDisease Outbreaks
dc.subject.meshEngland
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Monitoring
dc.subject.meshEpidemiological Monitoring
dc.subject.meshEscherichia coli Infections
dc.subject.meshEscherichia coli O157
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshFoodborne Diseases
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshIncidence
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshShiga Toxin 1
dc.titleAn outbreak of Vero cytotoxin producing Escherichia coli O157 infection associated with takeaway sandwiches.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPublic Health Laboratory, West Dorset Hospital, Dorchester.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalCommunicable disease report. CDR reviewen_GB
html.description.abstractAn outbreak of food poisoning due to Escherichia coli O157 phage type 2 Vero cytotoxin 2 affected 26 people in southern counties of England in May and June 1995. The organism was isolated from faecal specimens from 23 patients, 16 of whom lived in Dorset and seven in Hampshire. Isolates were indistinguishable by phage typing, Vero cytotoxin gene typing, restriction fragment length polymorphism, and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Three associated cases, linked epidemiologically to the outbreak, were confirmed serologically by detection of antibodies to E. coli O157 lipopolysaccharide. Twenty-two of the 26 patients were adults: four were admitted to hospital with haemorrhagic colitis. Four cases were children: two were admitted to hospital with haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS). There were no deaths. Although E. coli O157 was not isolated from any food samples, illness was associated with having eaten cold meats in sandwiches bought from two sandwich producers, in Weymouth and in Portsmouth. Both shops were supplied by the same wholesaler, who kept no records and obtained cooked meats from several sources in packs that did not carry adequate identification marks. It was, therefore, impossible to trace back to the original producer or to investigate further to determine the origin of contamination with E. coli O157. To protect the public health it is essential that all wholesale packs of ready-to-eat food carry date codes and the producer's identification mark. Detailed record keeping should be part of hazard analysis critical control point (HACCP) systems and should be maintained throughout the chain of distribution from the producer to retail outlets.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record