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dc.contributor.authorO’Shea, M. P.
dc.contributor.authorTeeling, M.
dc.contributor.authorBennett, K.
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-18T09:01:43Z
dc.date.available2014-06-18T09:01:43Z
dc.date.issued2014-05
dc.identifier.citationO'Shea MP, Teeling M, Bennett K. Regional variation in medication-taking behaviour of new users of oral anti-hyperglycaemic therapy in Ireland 2014 Irish Journal of Medical Science. Published online ahead of print.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0021-1265
dc.identifier.issn1863-4362
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11845-014-1132-1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/321801
dc.description.abstractFew studies have investigated regional variation in medication-taking behaviour. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there are regional differences in non-persistence and non-adherence to oral anti-hyperglycaemic agents in patients initiating therapy and examine if any association exists between different types of comorbidity in terms of medication-taking behaviour. Methods The Irish Health Services Executive (HSE) pharmacy claims database was used to identify new users of metformin or sulphonylureas, aged ≥25 years, initiating therapy between June 2009 and December 2010. Non-persistence and non-adherence were examined up to 12 months post-initiation. Comorbidity was assessed using modified RxRisk and RxRisk-V indices, and classified as either concordant and/or discordant with diabetes. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CIs) for non-persistence were determined in relation to both HSE region and comorbidity type using Cox proportional hazards model, adjusting for age, sex and initial OAH prescribed. Logistic regression analysis, adjusting for these covariates, was used to determine the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % CIs for non-adherence for both HSE region and comorbidity type. Results Results showed little overall difference between regions. The largest reduction for both non-persistence (HR 0.86, 95 % CI 0.80, 0.94) and non-adherence (OR 0.83, 95 % CI 0.74, 0.93) was observed in the south. Any comorbidity was associated with a reduced risk of non-persistence and non-adherence. Conclusions Interventions to optimise medication-taking in patients with T2DM should be implemented nationally to improve the overall level of adherence and persistence, especially in patients with no comorbidity.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Journal of Medical Scienceen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11845-014-1132-1en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Irish Journal of Medical Scienceen_GB
dc.subjectMEDICINESen_GB
dc.subject.otherCOMPLIANCEen_GB
dc.titleRegional variation in medication-taking behaviour of new users of oral anti-hyperglycaemic therapy in Irelanden_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIrish Journal of Medical Scienceen_GB
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen
html.description.abstractFew studies have investigated regional variation in medication-taking behaviour. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there are regional differences in non-persistence and non-adherence to oral anti-hyperglycaemic agents in patients initiating therapy and examine if any association exists between different types of comorbidity in terms of medication-taking behaviour. Methods The Irish Health Services Executive (HSE) pharmacy claims database was used to identify new users of metformin or sulphonylureas, aged ≥25 years, initiating therapy between June 2009 and December 2010. Non-persistence and non-adherence were examined up to 12 months post-initiation. Comorbidity was assessed using modified RxRisk and RxRisk-V indices, and classified as either concordant and/or discordant with diabetes. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CIs) for non-persistence were determined in relation to both HSE region and comorbidity type using Cox proportional hazards model, adjusting for age, sex and initial OAH prescribed. Logistic regression analysis, adjusting for these covariates, was used to determine the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % CIs for non-adherence for both HSE region and comorbidity type. Results Results showed little overall difference between regions. The largest reduction for both non-persistence (HR 0.86, 95 % CI 0.80, 0.94) and non-adherence (OR 0.83, 95 % CI 0.74, 0.93) was observed in the south. Any comorbidity was associated with a reduced risk of non-persistence and non-adherence. Conclusions Interventions to optimise medication-taking in patients with T2DM should be implemented nationally to improve the overall level of adherence and persistence, especially in patients with no comorbidity.


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