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dc.contributor.authorO Regan, Claire
dc.contributor.authorKearney, Patricia M
dc.contributor.authorCronin, Hilary
dc.contributor.authorSavva, George M
dc.contributor.authorLawlor, Brian A
dc.contributor.authorKenny, Roseanne
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-07T11:55:37Z
dc.date.available2013-11-07T11:55:37Z
dc.date.issued2013-10-18
dc.identifier.citationBMC Psychiatry. 2013 Oct 18;13(1):266en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-244X-13-266
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/305047
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background White matter hyperintensities may contribute to depression by disrupting neural connections among brain regions that regulate mood. Orthostatic hypotension (OH) may be a risk factor for white matter hyperintensities and accumulating evidence, although limited suggests it may play a role in the development of late-life depression. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between an oscillometric measure of orthostatic hypotension and depression in population based sample of older adults. Methods We analysed data on adults aged 60 and over from the first wave of The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA). Depression was assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies – Depression (CES–D) scale and OH was assessed by a sit-to-stand orthostatic stress test; two seated blood pressure measurements were followed by a single standing blood pressure measurement. Participants self reported whether they felt dizzy, light-headed or unsteady on standing. Results Participants with symptomatic OH (SOH, n=20) had the highest mean CES-D score (mean 8.6, SE 1.6) when compared to participants with asymptomatic OH (AOH) (mean 5.6, SE .48) and participants with no OH (mean 5.2, SE .14) and this difference was significant for both comparisons (p<0.001). Linear regression analysis adjusted for socio-demographic and clinical characteristics showed that SOH was associated with higher CES-D scores (unstandardised B coefficient = 2.24; 95% CI .301 - 4.79; p =0.05) compared to participants without OH. AOH was not associated with higher CES-D scores (unstandardised B coefficient =.162; 95% CI -.681, 1.00; p= 0.70). Conclusions Symptomatic orthostatic hypotension is associated with depression in older adults and needs to be considered in studies examining the relationship between vascular disease and depression in older adults.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectDEPRESSIONen_GB
dc.subjectOLDER PEOPLEen_GB
dc.subjectHYPERTENSIONen_GB
dc.subjectPSYCHIATRYen_GB
dc.titleOscillometric measure of blood pressure detects association between orthostatic hypotension and depression in population based study of older adultsen_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.rights.holderClaire O Regan et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
dc.description.statusPeer Reviewed
dc.date.updated2013-11-04T16:09:19Z
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-23T09:21:01Z
html.description.abstractAbstract Background White matter hyperintensities may contribute to depression by disrupting neural connections among brain regions that regulate mood. Orthostatic hypotension (OH) may be a risk factor for white matter hyperintensities and accumulating evidence, although limited suggests it may play a role in the development of late-life depression. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between an oscillometric measure of orthostatic hypotension and depression in population based sample of older adults. Methods We analysed data on adults aged 60 and over from the first wave of The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA). Depression was assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies &#8211; Depression (CES&#8211;D) scale and OH was assessed by a sit-to-stand orthostatic stress test; two seated blood pressure measurements were followed by a single standing blood pressure measurement. Participants self reported whether they felt dizzy, light-headed or unsteady on standing. Results Participants with symptomatic OH (SOH, n=20) had the highest mean CES-D score (mean 8.6, SE 1.6) when compared to participants with asymptomatic OH (AOH) (mean 5.6, SE .48) and participants with no OH (mean 5.2, SE .14) and this difference was significant for both comparisons (p&lt;0.001). Linear regression analysis adjusted for socio-demographic and clinical characteristics showed that SOH was associated with higher CES-D scores (unstandardised B coefficient = 2.24; 95% CI .301 - 4.79; p =0.05) compared to participants without OH. AOH was not associated with higher CES-D scores (unstandardised B coefficient =.162; 95% CI -.681, 1.00; p= 0.70). Conclusions Symptomatic orthostatic hypotension is associated with depression in older adults and needs to be considered in studies examining the relationship between vascular disease and depression in older adults.


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