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dc.contributor.authorMcGowan, B
dc.contributor.authorBergin, C
dc.contributor.authorBennett, K
dc.contributor.authorBarry, M
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-04T13:45:19Z
dc.date.available2013-10-04T13:45:19Z
dc.date.issued2008-10
dc.identifier.citationUtilisation of antibiotic therapy in community practice. 2008, 101 (9):273-6 Ir Med Jen_GB
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102
dc.identifier.pmid19051615
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/302721
dc.description.abstractThe aim of the study was to identify outpatient antibiotic consumption between Jan 2000 and Dec 2005 through analysis of the HSE-Primary Care Reimbursement Services (PCRS) database as part of the Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance in Ireland (SARI) project. Total antibiotic consumption on the PCRS scheme between January 2000 and December 2005 expressed in Defined Daily Dose per 1000 PCRS inhabitants per day increased by 26%. The penicillin group represents the highest consumption accounting for approximately 50% of the total outpatient antibiotic use. Total DIDs for this group increased by 25% between 2000 and 2005. Co-amoxiclav and amoxicillin account for 80% of the total consumption of this group of anti-infectives. With the exception of aminoglycosides and sulfonamides which demonstrated a decrease in DID consumption of 47% and 8% respectively, all other groups of anti-infectives had an increase in DID consumption of greater than 25% during the study period. Antibiotic prescribing data is a valuable tool for assessing public health strategies aiming to optimise antibiotic prescribing.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish medical journalen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19051615en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Irish medical journalen_GB
dc.subjectCOMMUNITY HEALTHen_GB
dc.subjectPRESCRIBINGen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnti-Bacterial Agents
dc.subject.meshBacterial Infections
dc.subject.meshCommunity Health Services
dc.subject.meshDatabases as Topic
dc.subject.meshDrug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshOutpatients
dc.subject.meshPhysician's Practice Patterns
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors
dc.subject.otherANTIBIOTICSen_GB
dc.titleUtilisation of antibiotic therapy in community practice.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNational Centre for Pharmacoeconomics, St James's Hospital, James's St, Dublin 8. mcgowab@tcd.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen_GB
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-23T08:09:44Z
html.description.abstractThe aim of the study was to identify outpatient antibiotic consumption between Jan 2000 and Dec 2005 through analysis of the HSE-Primary Care Reimbursement Services (PCRS) database as part of the Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance in Ireland (SARI) project. Total antibiotic consumption on the PCRS scheme between January 2000 and December 2005 expressed in Defined Daily Dose per 1000 PCRS inhabitants per day increased by 26%. The penicillin group represents the highest consumption accounting for approximately 50% of the total outpatient antibiotic use. Total DIDs for this group increased by 25% between 2000 and 2005. Co-amoxiclav and amoxicillin account for 80% of the total consumption of this group of anti-infectives. With the exception of aminoglycosides and sulfonamides which demonstrated a decrease in DID consumption of 47% and 8% respectively, all other groups of anti-infectives had an increase in DID consumption of greater than 25% during the study period. Antibiotic prescribing data is a valuable tool for assessing public health strategies aiming to optimise antibiotic prescribing.


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