Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRamsay, M E
dc.contributor.authorMoffatt, D
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, M
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-03T15:12:26Z
dc.date.available2013-10-03T15:12:26Z
dc.date.issued1994-04
dc.identifier.citationMeasles vaccine: a 27-year follow-up. 1994, 112 (2):409-12 Epidemiol. Infect.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0950-2688
dc.identifier.pmid8150015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/302676
dc.description.abstractIn 1964, the Medical Research Council undertook a trial of measles vaccine in over 36,000 United Kingdom children; 9577 of whom received live vaccine, 10,625 received inactivated followed by live vaccines, and 16,328 acted as unvaccinated controls. Participants in this study have been followed to determine the long term protection from measles vaccine and follow-up data were available on 4194, 4638 and 274 respectively. During the 5-year period 1986-90, the protective efficacy of live measles vaccine has remained high at 87%, but the 95% confidence interval was wide (-43 to 99%) due to the small numbers of cases. Between 1976 and 1990, however, the overall efficacy of the live vaccine was 92% (95% confidence interval 86 to 95%) and there was no evidence of a decline in efficacy (P = 0.13) over the 15-year period. This study suggests that the protection from live measles vaccine persists for up to 27 years after vaccination, and that no change in the current United Kingdom measles immunization policy should be made on the grounds of waning immunity.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Epidemiology and infectionen_GB
dc.subjectMEASLESen_GB
dc.subjectVACCINESen_GB
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool
dc.subject.meshConfidence Intervals
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studies
dc.subject.meshGreat Britain
dc.subject.meshHealth Policy
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshImmunization Schedule
dc.subject.meshImmunization, Secondary
dc.subject.meshIncidence
dc.subject.meshInfant
dc.subject.meshMeasles
dc.subject.meshMeasles Vaccine
dc.subject.meshPopulation Surveillance
dc.subject.meshTreatment Failure
dc.subject.meshVaccines, Attenuated
dc.subject.meshVaccines, Inactivated
dc.titleMeasles vaccine: a 27-year follow-up.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentImmunisation Division, PHLS Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre, London.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalEpidemiology and infectionen_GB
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-23T08:07:59Z
html.description.abstractIn 1964, the Medical Research Council undertook a trial of measles vaccine in over 36,000 United Kingdom children; 9577 of whom received live vaccine, 10,625 received inactivated followed by live vaccines, and 16,328 acted as unvaccinated controls. Participants in this study have been followed to determine the long term protection from measles vaccine and follow-up data were available on 4194, 4638 and 274 respectively. During the 5-year period 1986-90, the protective efficacy of live measles vaccine has remained high at 87%, but the 95% confidence interval was wide (-43 to 99%) due to the small numbers of cases. Between 1976 and 1990, however, the overall efficacy of the live vaccine was 92% (95% confidence interval 86 to 95%) and there was no evidence of a decline in efficacy (P = 0.13) over the 15-year period. This study suggests that the protection from live measles vaccine persists for up to 27 years after vaccination, and that no change in the current United Kingdom measles immunization policy should be made on the grounds of waning immunity.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
epidinfect00044-0172.pdf
Size:
487.1Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record