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dc.contributor.authorOffice of the Information Commissioner
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-24T08:24:21Z
dc.date.available2013-07-24T08:24:21Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.issn16490479
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/296917
dc.description[from the summary] As 2013 marks the 15th anniversary of the introduction of the FOI Act, I have had cause recently to pause and reflect upon the peaks and troughs of the evolution of the FOI legislation since its introduction. It is significant that I should do so in a year when the Government is putting the finishing touches to delivering on the commitment it made in its Programme for Government in 2011, namely, to restore the FOI Act to what it was before it was amended in 2003 and to extend its remit to other public bodies. In an address which I gave at a conference hosted by the University of Limerick on 11 February 2013 to examine the impact of 15 years of the FOI Act on Ireland, I commented that the ebb and flow of an Act which was widely lauded when introduced, subsequently significantly truncated, and now proposed for restoration, highlights one particular truth about FOI – that Governments worldwide treat the information in their possession as a resource, to be doled out in amounts as they see fit, either copious flows or mean little trickles. I noted that ultimately, it is the Government that controls the tap. I have stated before that the introduction of FOI cued nothing less than a complete culture shift. Before FOI, a culture of withholding information unless exceptional circumstances prevailed and even a paternalistic approach to dealing with the private affairs of citizens was the norm. The introduction of FOI in Ireland in 1998 “let in the light” on many areas of public administration. Over the course of the following years, we witnessed huge improvements in the amount and type of information which is now available as a matter of course. Access to far greater levels of personal information empowered citizens. Indeed, many of my Office’s decisions played their part, often significant, in shining the light on previously unbreached areas of the public service.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOffice of the Information Commissioneren_GB
dc.subjectCOMMUNITY INFORMATION AND ADVICE SERVICEen_GB
dc.titleOffice of the Information Commissioner annual report 2012en_GB
dc.typeReporten
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-23T06:33:24Z


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