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dc.contributor.authorCummins, Joanne
dc.contributor.authorTangney, Mark
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-04T13:21:12Z
dc.date.available2013-06-04T13:21:12Z
dc.date.issued2013-03-28
dc.identifier.citationInfectious Agents and Cancer. 2013 Mar 28;8(1):11en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1750-9378-8-11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/293370
dc.description.abstractAbstract Associations between different bacteria and various tumours have been reported in patients for decades. Studies involving characterisation of bacteria within tumour tissues have traditionally been in the context of tumourigenesis as a result of bacterial presence within healthy tissues, and in general, dogma holds that such bacteria are causative agents of malignancy (directly or indirectly). While evidence suggests that this may be the case for certain tumour types and bacterial species, it is plausible that in many cases, clinical observations of bacteria within tumours arise from spontaneous infection of established tumours. Indeed, growth of bacteria specifically within tumours following deliberate systemic administration has been demonstrated for numerous bacterial species at preclinical and clinical levels. We present the available data on links between bacteria and tumours, and propose that besides the few instances in which pathogens are playing a pathogenic role in cancer, in many instances, the prevalent relationship between solid tumours and bacteria is opportunistic rather than causative, and discuss opportunities for exploiting tumour-specific bacterial growth for cancer treatment.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCANCERen_GB
dc.subjectINFECTION CONTROLen_GB
dc.titleBacteria and tumours: causative agents or opportunistic inhabitants?en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInfectious agents and canceren_GB
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.rights.holderJoanne Cummins et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
dc.description.statusPeer Reviewed
dc.date.updated2013-05-30T15:07:24Z
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-23T05:36:07Z
html.description.abstractAbstract Associations between different bacteria and various tumours have been reported in patients for decades. Studies involving characterisation of bacteria within tumour tissues have traditionally been in the context of tumourigenesis as a result of bacterial presence within healthy tissues, and in general, dogma holds that such bacteria are causative agents of malignancy (directly or indirectly). While evidence suggests that this may be the case for certain tumour types and bacterial species, it is plausible that in many cases, clinical observations of bacteria within tumours arise from spontaneous infection of established tumours. Indeed, growth of bacteria specifically within tumours following deliberate systemic administration has been demonstrated for numerous bacterial species at preclinical and clinical levels. We present the available data on links between bacteria and tumours, and propose that besides the few instances in which pathogens are playing a pathogenic role in cancer, in many instances, the prevalent relationship between solid tumours and bacteria is opportunistic rather than causative, and discuss opportunities for exploiting tumour-specific bacterial growth for cancer treatment.


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