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dc.contributor.authorGaughan, Eve
dc.contributor.authorEogan, Maeve
dc.contributor.authorHolohan, Mary
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-21T14:39:39Z
dc.date.available2013-05-21T14:39:39Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationPyomyositis after vaginal delivery. 2011, 2011: BMJ Case Repen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1757-790X
dc.identifier.pmid22693277
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bcr.04.2011.4109
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/292562
dc.description.abstractPyomyositis is a purulent infection of skeletal muscle that arises from haematogenous spread, usually with abscess formation. It can develop after a transient bacteraemia of any cause. This type of infection has never been reported before in the literature after vaginal delivery. A 34-year-old woman had progressive severe pain in the left buttock and thigh and weakness in the left lower limb day 1 post spontaneous vaginal delivery. MRI showed severe oedema of the left gluteus, iliacus, piriformis and adductor muscles of the left thigh and a small fluid collection at the left hip joint. She was diagnosed with pyomyositis. She had fever of 37.9°C immediately postpartum and her risk factors for bacteraemia were a mild IV cannula-associated cellulitis and labour itself. She required prolonged treatment with antibiotics before significant clinical improvement was noted.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to BMJ case reportsen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshDelivery, Obstetric
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshPuerperal Disorders
dc.subject.meshPyomyositis
dc.titlePyomyositis after vaginal delivery.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Rotunda Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. evegaughan@yahoo.co.uken_GB
dc.identifier.journalBMJ case reportsen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
html.description.abstractPyomyositis is a purulent infection of skeletal muscle that arises from haematogenous spread, usually with abscess formation. It can develop after a transient bacteraemia of any cause. This type of infection has never been reported before in the literature after vaginal delivery. A 34-year-old woman had progressive severe pain in the left buttock and thigh and weakness in the left lower limb day 1 post spontaneous vaginal delivery. MRI showed severe oedema of the left gluteus, iliacus, piriformis and adductor muscles of the left thigh and a small fluid collection at the left hip joint. She was diagnosed with pyomyositis. She had fever of 37.9°C immediately postpartum and her risk factors for bacteraemia were a mild IV cannula-associated cellulitis and labour itself. She required prolonged treatment with antibiotics before significant clinical improvement was noted.


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