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dc.contributor.authorMoran, Gary P
dc.contributor.authorColeman, David C
dc.contributor.authorSullivan, Derek J
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-21T12:02:30Z
dc.date.available2013-05-21T12:02:30Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationCandida albicans versus Candida dubliniensis: Why Is C. albicans More Pathogenic? 2012, 2012:205921 Int J Microbiolen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1687-9198
dc.identifier.pmid21904553
dc.identifier.doi10.1155/2012/205921
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/292512
dc.description.abstractCandida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are highly related pathogenic yeast species. However, C. albicans is far more prevalent in human infection and has been shown to be more pathogenic in a wide range of infection models. Comparison of the genomes of the two species has revealed that they are very similar although there are some significant differences, largely due to the expansion of virulence-related gene families (e.g., ALS and SAP) in C. albicans, and increased levels of pseudogenisation in C. dubliniensis. Comparative global gene expression analyses have also been used to investigate differences in the ability of the two species to tolerate environmental stress and to produce hyphae, two traits that are likely to play a role in the lower virulence of C. dubliniensis. Taken together, these data suggest that C. dubliniensis is in the process of undergoing reductive evolution and may have become adapted for growth in a specialized anatomic niche.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInternational journal of microbiologyen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International journal of microbiologyen_GB
dc.titleCandida albicans versus Candida dubliniensis: Why Is C. albicans More Pathogenic?en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Oral Biosciences, Dublin Dental University Hospital, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalInternational journal of microbiologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-23T05:21:12Z
html.description.abstractCandida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are highly related pathogenic yeast species. However, C. albicans is far more prevalent in human infection and has been shown to be more pathogenic in a wide range of infection models. Comparison of the genomes of the two species has revealed that they are very similar although there are some significant differences, largely due to the expansion of virulence-related gene families (e.g., ALS and SAP) in C. albicans, and increased levels of pseudogenisation in C. dubliniensis. Comparative global gene expression analyses have also been used to investigate differences in the ability of the two species to tolerate environmental stress and to produce hyphae, two traits that are likely to play a role in the lower virulence of C. dubliniensis. Taken together, these data suggest that C. dubliniensis is in the process of undergoing reductive evolution and may have become adapted for growth in a specialized anatomic niche.


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