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dc.contributor.authorMcSharry, David
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Ciara
dc.contributor.authorMcNicholas, Triona
dc.contributor.authorLangran, Simon
dc.contributor.authorO'Sullivan, Michael
dc.contributor.authorLowery, Madeleine
dc.contributor.authorMcNicholas, Walter T
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-14T11:43:01Z
dc.date.available2013-05-14T11:43:01Z
dc.date.issued2012-08-15
dc.identifier.citationGenioglossus fatigue in obstructive sleep apnea. 2012, 183 (2):59-66 Respir Physiol Neurobiolen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1878-1519
dc.identifier.pmid22677657
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.resp.2012.05.024
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/291082
dc.description.abstractObstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a prevalent disorder that may cause cardiovascular disease and fatal traffic accidents but the pathophysiology remains incompletely understood. Increased fatigability of the genioglossus (the principal upper airway dilator muscle) might be important in OSA pathophysiology but the existing literature is uncertain. We hypothesized that the genioglossus in OSA subjects would fatigue more than in controls. In 9 OSA subjects and 9 controls during wakefulness we measured maximum voluntary tongue protrusion force (Tpmax). Using surface electromyography arrays we measured the rate of decline in muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) during an isometric fatiguing contraction at 30% Tpmax. The rate of decline in MFCV provides an objective means of quantifying localized muscle fatigue. Linear regression analysis of individual subject data demonstrated a significantly greater decrease in MFCV in OSA subjects compared to control subjects (29.2 ± 20.8% [mean ± SD] versus 11.2 ± 20.8%; p=0.04). These data support increased fatigability of the genioglossus muscle in OSA subjects which may be important in the pathophysiology of OSA.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Respiratory physiology & neurobiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshElectromyography
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshIsometric Contraction
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshMuscle Fatigue
dc.subject.meshMuscle, Skeletal
dc.subject.meshNeural Conduction
dc.subject.meshSleep Apnea, Obstructive
dc.subject.meshTongue
dc.subject.meshWakefulness
dc.titleGenioglossus fatigue in obstructive sleep apnea.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSleep Research Laboratory, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. dmcsharry@partners.orgen_GB
dc.identifier.journalRespiratory physiology & neurobiologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
html.description.abstractObstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a prevalent disorder that may cause cardiovascular disease and fatal traffic accidents but the pathophysiology remains incompletely understood. Increased fatigability of the genioglossus (the principal upper airway dilator muscle) might be important in OSA pathophysiology but the existing literature is uncertain. We hypothesized that the genioglossus in OSA subjects would fatigue more than in controls. In 9 OSA subjects and 9 controls during wakefulness we measured maximum voluntary tongue protrusion force (Tpmax). Using surface electromyography arrays we measured the rate of decline in muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) during an isometric fatiguing contraction at 30% Tpmax. The rate of decline in MFCV provides an objective means of quantifying localized muscle fatigue. Linear regression analysis of individual subject data demonstrated a significantly greater decrease in MFCV in OSA subjects compared to control subjects (29.2 ± 20.8% [mean ± SD] versus 11.2 ± 20.8%; p=0.04). These data support increased fatigability of the genioglossus muscle in OSA subjects which may be important in the pathophysiology of OSA.


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