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dc.contributor.authorPerrotta, Carla
dc.contributor.authorStaines, Anthony
dc.contributor.authorCodd, Mary
dc.contributor.authorKleefeld, Silke
dc.contributor.authorCrowley, Dominique
dc.contributor.authorT’ Mannetje, Andrea
dc.contributor.authorBecker, Nicholas
dc.contributor.authorBrennan, Paul
dc.contributor.authorDe Sanjosé, Silvia
dc.contributor.authorForetova, Lenka
dc.contributor.authorMaynadié, Marck
dc.contributor.authorNieters, Alexandra
dc.contributor.authorBoffetta, Paolo
dc.contributor.authorCocco, Pierluggi
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-30T10:12:05Z
dc.date.available2013-01-30T10:12:05Z
dc.date.issued2012-12-14
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology. 2012 Dec 14;7(1):25
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1745-6673-7-25
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/267652
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background The EPILYMPH study applied a detailed occupational exposure assessment approach to a large multi-centre case–control study conducted in six European countries. This paper analysed multiple myeloma (MM) risk associated with level of education, and lifetime occupational history and occupational exposures, based on the EPILYMPH data set. Methods 277 MM cases and four matched controls per each case were included. Controls were randomly selected, matching for age (+/− 5 years), centre and gender. Lifetime occupations and lifetime exposure to specific workplace agents was obtained through a detailed questionnaire. Local industrial hygienists assessed likelihood and intensity for specific exposures. The odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals (OR, 95% CI) were calculated for level of education, individual occupations and specific exposures. Unconditional logistic regression models were run for individual occupations and exposures. Results A low level of education was associated with MM OR=1.68 (95% CI 1.02-2.76). An increased risk was observed for general farmers (OR=1.77; 95% CI 1.05-2.99) and cleaning workers (OR=1.69; 95% CI 1.04-2.72) adjusting for level of education. Risk was also elevated, although not significant, for printers (OR=2.06; 95% CI 0.97-4.34). Pesticide exposure over a period of ten years or more increased MM risk (OR=1.62; 95% CI 1.01-2.58). Conclusion These results confirm an association of MM with farm work, and indicate its association with printing and cleaning. While prolonged exposure to pesticides seems to be a risk factor for MM, an excess risk associated with exposure to organic solvents could not be confirmed.
dc.titleMultiple Myeloma and lifetime occupation: results from the EPILYMPH study
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.rights.holderCarla Perrotta et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
dc.description.statusPeer Reviewed
dc.date.updated2013-01-28T20:08:49Z
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-23T21:12:18Z
html.description.abstractAbstract Background The EPILYMPH study applied a detailed occupational exposure assessment approach to a large multi-centre case–control study conducted in six European countries. This paper analysed multiple myeloma (MM) risk associated with level of education, and lifetime occupational history and occupational exposures, based on the EPILYMPH data set. Methods 277 MM cases and four matched controls per each case were included. Controls were randomly selected, matching for age (+/− 5 years), centre and gender. Lifetime occupations and lifetime exposure to specific workplace agents was obtained through a detailed questionnaire. Local industrial hygienists assessed likelihood and intensity for specific exposures. The odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals (OR, 95% CI) were calculated for level of education, individual occupations and specific exposures. Unconditional logistic regression models were run for individual occupations and exposures. Results A low level of education was associated with MM OR=1.68 (95% CI 1.02-2.76). An increased risk was observed for general farmers (OR=1.77; 95% CI 1.05-2.99) and cleaning workers (OR=1.69; 95% CI 1.04-2.72) adjusting for level of education. Risk was also elevated, although not significant, for printers (OR=2.06; 95% CI 0.97-4.34). Pesticide exposure over a period of ten years or more increased MM risk (OR=1.62; 95% CI 1.01-2.58). Conclusion These results confirm an association of MM with farm work, and indicate its association with printing and cleaning. While prolonged exposure to pesticides seems to be a risk factor for MM, an excess risk associated with exposure to organic solvents could not be confirmed.


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