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dc.contributor.authorCooney, M T*
dc.contributor.authorStorey, S*
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, L*
dc.contributor.authorDudina, A*
dc.contributor.authorHall, M*
dc.contributor.authorHemeryck, L*
dc.contributor.authorFeely, J*
dc.contributor.authorGraham, I*
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-27T15:31:02Z
dc.date.available2012-11-27T15:31:02Z
dc.date.issued2009-04
dc.identifier.citationEUROASPIRE (European Action on Secondary Prevention through Intervention to Reduce Events) III--a comparison of Irish and European results. 2009, 102 (4):113-6 Ir Med Jen_GB
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102
dc.identifier.pmid19552291
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/253461
dc.description.abstractThe EUROASPIRE III audit was a Europe-wide study which took place in 2006/2007. The objective was to examine the control of risk factors in subjects with established cardiovascular disease. Here, we compare the Irish results to those of the other 21 European countries which participated. Control of blood cholesterol was significantly better in Irish participants, with 73% below the target of 4.5 mmol/l. Blood pressure control was less satisfactory in both Irish and European individuals, with an average of 52% of Irish participants not achieving blood pressure targets. Medication usage was high throughout, particularly anti-platelet agents, beta-blockers and, especially in Ireland, statins. Obesity figures were particularly high in Ireland and throughout Europe, with 82% Irish men and women either overweight or obese. Smoking figures in Irish women were also of concern, with 24% continuing to smoke. Cardiac rehabilitation attendance was particularly high in Ireland, with 68% attending; substantially higher than the European figure of 34%. In common with the rest of Europe, current control of body weight and blood pressure in Ireland is unsatisfactory and in need of increased consideration on the part of both patients and healthcare professionals.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish medical journalen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Irish medical journalen_GB
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseases
dc.subject.meshCholesterol
dc.subject.meshEurope
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshHypercholesterolemia
dc.subject.meshHypertension
dc.subject.meshIreland
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshObesity
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors
dc.subject.meshSecondary Prevention
dc.titleEUROASPIRE (European Action on Secondary Prevention through Intervention to Reduce Events) III--a comparison of Irish and European results.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Cardiology, AMNCH, Tallaght, Dublin.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
html.description.abstractThe EUROASPIRE III audit was a Europe-wide study which took place in 2006/2007. The objective was to examine the control of risk factors in subjects with established cardiovascular disease. Here, we compare the Irish results to those of the other 21 European countries which participated. Control of blood cholesterol was significantly better in Irish participants, with 73% below the target of 4.5 mmol/l. Blood pressure control was less satisfactory in both Irish and European individuals, with an average of 52% of Irish participants not achieving blood pressure targets. Medication usage was high throughout, particularly anti-platelet agents, beta-blockers and, especially in Ireland, statins. Obesity figures were particularly high in Ireland and throughout Europe, with 82% Irish men and women either overweight or obese. Smoking figures in Irish women were also of concern, with 24% continuing to smoke. Cardiac rehabilitation attendance was particularly high in Ireland, with 68% attending; substantially higher than the European figure of 34%. In common with the rest of Europe, current control of body weight and blood pressure in Ireland is unsatisfactory and in need of increased consideration on the part of both patients and healthcare professionals.


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