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dc.contributor.authorConcannon, E S
dc.contributor.authorHogan, A M
dc.contributor.authorFlood, L
dc.contributor.authorKhan, W
dc.contributor.authorWaldron, R
dc.contributor.authorBarry, K
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-10T08:21:03Z
dc.date.available2012-10-10T08:21:03Z
dc.date.issued2012-09-11
dc.identifier.citationDay of surgery admission for the elective surgical in-patient: successful implementation of the Elective Surgery Programme. 2012: Ir J Med Scien_GB
dc.identifier.issn1863-4362
dc.identifier.pmid22965814
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11845-012-0850-5
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/248091
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND AND AIMS: The aim of this prospective cross-sectional study was to determine the impact of (1) ring fencing in-patient general surgical beds and (2) introducing a pre-operative assessment clinic (PAC) on the day of surgery admission (DOSA) rate in a single Irish institution. The secondary aim was to analyse the impact of an increased rate of DOSA on cost efficiency and patient satisfaction. METHODS: An 18-month period was examined following ring-fencing of elective and emergency surgical beds. A PAC was established during the study period. Prospectively collected data pertaining to all surgical admissions were retrieved using patient administration system software (Powerterm Pro, Eircom Software) and a database of performance information from Irish Public Health Services (HealthStat). RESULTS: Ring-fencing and PAC establishment was associated with a significant increase in the overall DOSA rate from 56 to 85 %, surpassing the national target rate of DOSA (75 %). Data relating specifically to general surgery admissions mirrored this increase in DOSA rate from a median of 5 patients per month, before the advent of ring-fencing and PAC, to 42 patients per month (p < 0.0387). 100 patient surveys demonstrated high levels of satisfaction with DOSA, with a preference compared to admission one night pre-operatively. Cost analysis demonstrated overall savings of 340,370 Euro from this change in practice. CONCLUSION: The present study supports the practice of DOSA through the introduction of ring-fenced surgical beds and PAC. This has been shown to improve hospital resource utilisation and streamline surgical service provision in these economically challenging times.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe final publication is available at www.springerlink.comen_GB
dc.languageENG
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.springerlink.comen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Irish journal of medical scienceen_GB
dc.titleDay of surgery admission for the elective surgical in-patient: successful implementation of the Elective Surgery Programme.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, Mayo General Hospital, Castlebar, County Mayo, Ireland, lizconcannon@gmail.com.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish journal of medical scienceen_GB
dc.description.provinceConnachten
refterms.dateFOA2013-09-11T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractBACKGROUND AND AIMS: The aim of this prospective cross-sectional study was to determine the impact of (1) ring fencing in-patient general surgical beds and (2) introducing a pre-operative assessment clinic (PAC) on the day of surgery admission (DOSA) rate in a single Irish institution. The secondary aim was to analyse the impact of an increased rate of DOSA on cost efficiency and patient satisfaction. METHODS: An 18-month period was examined following ring-fencing of elective and emergency surgical beds. A PAC was established during the study period. Prospectively collected data pertaining to all surgical admissions were retrieved using patient administration system software (Powerterm Pro, Eircom Software) and a database of performance information from Irish Public Health Services (HealthStat). RESULTS: Ring-fencing and PAC establishment was associated with a significant increase in the overall DOSA rate from 56 to 85 %, surpassing the national target rate of DOSA (75 %). Data relating specifically to general surgery admissions mirrored this increase in DOSA rate from a median of 5 patients per month, before the advent of ring-fencing and PAC, to 42 patients per month (p < 0.0387). 100 patient surveys demonstrated high levels of satisfaction with DOSA, with a preference compared to admission one night pre-operatively. Cost analysis demonstrated overall savings of 340,370 Euro from this change in practice. CONCLUSION: The present study supports the practice of DOSA through the introduction of ring-fenced surgical beds and PAC. This has been shown to improve hospital resource utilisation and streamline surgical service provision in these economically challenging times.


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