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dc.contributor.authorFlinn, Aisling
dc.contributor.authorMacken, Alan P
dc.contributor.authorCullen, Walter
dc.contributor.authorLeddin, Des
dc.contributor.authorDunne, Colum
dc.contributor.authorO’Gorman, Clodagh S
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-13T08:56:47Z
dc.date.available2012-09-13T08:56:47Z
dc.date.issued2012-09-06
dc.identifier.citationBMC Research Notes. 2012 Sep 06;5(1):491
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1756-0500-5-491
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/243764
dc.description.abstractAbstractBackgroundOverweight and obesity is a growing problem in Ireland. Many parents are unaware when their child is overweight or obese. Our objectives were to examine parents’ perceptions of a healthy diet and their children’s BMI; and to evaluate the food offered to children in our paediatric in-patient unit.FindingsA retrospective questionnaire was distributed to 95 patients and their families admitted over one month. Seventy-eight had BMI values calculated (42 males, 36 females). Twenty-one children (26.9%) were overweight/obese: 14/21 parents (66.7%) thought their child had a normal weight. Sixty percent of children served dinner in the hospital were given fried potatoes. Four had fruit/vegetables. Forty-six parents brought food into hospital, of these 14 brought purchased food.ConclusionsThis study highlights the problem of child obesity in Ireland and parental underestimation of this problem. The nutritional value of food served to children in hospital needs to be improved and hospital admissions used as opportunities to promote healthy eating habits.
dc.titleChildren in hospital in Ireland - what do they eat and what do they weigh: a cross-sectional study
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.rights.holderAisling Flinn et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
dc.description.statusPeer Reviewed
dc.date.updated2012-09-12T19:08:15Z
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-22T22:02:29Z
html.description.abstractAbstractBackgroundOverweight and obesity is a growing problem in Ireland. Many parents are unaware when their child is overweight or obese. Our objectives were to examine parents’ perceptions of a healthy diet and their children’s BMI; and to evaluate the food offered to children in our paediatric in-patient unit.FindingsA retrospective questionnaire was distributed to 95 patients and their families admitted over one month. Seventy-eight had BMI values calculated (42 males, 36 females). Twenty-one children (26.9%) were overweight/obese: 14/21 parents (66.7%) thought their child had a normal weight. Sixty percent of children served dinner in the hospital were given fried potatoes. Four had fruit/vegetables. Forty-six parents brought food into hospital, of these 14 brought purchased food.ConclusionsThis study highlights the problem of child obesity in Ireland and parental underestimation of this problem. The nutritional value of food served to children in hospital needs to be improved and hospital admissions used as opportunities to promote healthy eating habits.


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