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dc.contributor.authorMcWilliams, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorEgan, Patrick
dc.contributor.authorJackson, Deirdre
dc.contributor.authorRenwick, Laoise
dc.contributor.authorFoley, Sharon
dc.contributor.authorBehan, Caragh
dc.contributor.authorFitzgerald, Emma
dc.contributor.authorFetherston, Alastair
dc.contributor.authorTurner, Niall
dc.contributor.authorKinsella, Anthony
dc.contributor.authorO'Callaghan, Eadbhard
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-07T14:00:42Z
dc.date.available2012-09-07T14:00:42Z
dc.date.issued2010-01
dc.identifier.citationCaregiver psychoeducation for first-episode psychosis. 2010, 25 (1):33-8 Eur. Psychiatryen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1778-3585
dc.identifier.pmid19926257
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.eurpsy.2009.08.006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/241860
dc.descriptionInternational best-practice guidelines for the management of first-episode psychosis have recommended the provision of psychoeducation for multifamily groups. While there is ample evidence of their efficacy in multiepisode psychosis, there is a paucity of evidence supporting this approach specifically for first-episode psychosis. We sought to determine whether a six-week caregiver psychoeducation programme geared specifically at first-episode psychosis improves caregiver knowledge and attitudes.en_GB
dc.description.abstractInternational best-practice guidelines for the management of first-episode psychosis have recommended the provision of psychoeducation for multifamily groups. While there is ample evidence of their efficacy in multiepisode psychosis, there is a paucity of evidence supporting this approach specifically for first-episode psychosis. We sought to determine whether a six-week caregiver psychoeducation programme geared specifically at first-episode psychosis improves caregiver knowledge and attitudes.
dc.description.abstractCaregivers of people with first-episode psychosis completed a 23-item adapted version of the self-report Family Questionnaire (KQ) and a 17-item adapted version of the self-report Drug Attitudes Inventory (DAI) before and after the six-week DETECT Information and Support Course (DISC). Using a Generalised Linear Repeated Measures Model, we analyzed the differences in proportions of correct answers before and after the programme.
dc.description.abstractOver a 24-month study period, 31 caregivers (13 higher socioeconomic; 13 lower socioeconomic; five unspecified socioeconomic; 19 female; 12 male) participated in the DISC programme and completed inventories before and after the course. Knowledge of psychosis and specific knowledge of medication treatment improved among caregivers overall (p<.01; effect sizes 0.78 and 0.94 respectively). There were no significant gender or socioeconomic differences in any improvement.
dc.description.abstractThis study confirms that caregiver psychoeducation specifically for first-episode psychosis directly improves knowledge of the illness overall and, in particular, knowledge of medication. Gender is not a factor in this, while the lack of any socioeconomic differences dispels the myth that patients in lower socioeconomic groups are disadvantaged because their caregivers know less.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to European psychiatry : the journal of the Association of European Psychiatristsen_GB
dc.subjectMENTAL ILLNESSen_GB
dc.subjectCARERen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshAged
dc.subject.meshAttitude to Health
dc.subject.meshCaregivers
dc.subject.meshDrug Therapy
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshGuidelines as Topic
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshPsychotic Disorders
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult
dc.subject.otherCAREGIVERS EDUCATIONen_GB
dc.subject.otherPSYCHOTIC DISORDERS PSYCHOLOGYen_GB
dc.subject.otherPSYCHOEDUCATIONen_GB
dc.subject.otherPSYCHOSISen_GB
dc.subject.otherADOLESCENTen_GB
dc.subject.otherQUESTIONNAIRESen_GB
dc.titleCaregiver psychoeducation for first-episode psychosis.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDETECT Early Intervention in Psychosis Service, DETECT, Avila House, Block 5, Blackrock Business Park, Carysfort Avenue, Co. Dublin, Ireland. drstevemb@gmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalEuropean psychiatry : the journal of the Association of European Psychiatristsen_GB
html.description.abstractInternational best-practice guidelines for the management of first-episode psychosis have recommended the provision of psychoeducation for multifamily groups. While there is ample evidence of their efficacy in multiepisode psychosis, there is a paucity of evidence supporting this approach specifically for first-episode psychosis. We sought to determine whether a six-week caregiver psychoeducation programme geared specifically at first-episode psychosis improves caregiver knowledge and attitudes.
html.description.abstractCaregivers of people with first-episode psychosis completed a 23-item adapted version of the self-report Family Questionnaire (KQ) and a 17-item adapted version of the self-report Drug Attitudes Inventory (DAI) before and after the six-week DETECT Information and Support Course (DISC). Using a Generalised Linear Repeated Measures Model, we analyzed the differences in proportions of correct answers before and after the programme.
html.description.abstractOver a 24-month study period, 31 caregivers (13 higher socioeconomic; 13 lower socioeconomic; five unspecified socioeconomic; 19 female; 12 male) participated in the DISC programme and completed inventories before and after the course. Knowledge of psychosis and specific knowledge of medication treatment improved among caregivers overall (p<.01; effect sizes 0.78 and 0.94 respectively). There were no significant gender or socioeconomic differences in any improvement.
html.description.abstractThis study confirms that caregiver psychoeducation specifically for first-episode psychosis directly improves knowledge of the illness overall and, in particular, knowledge of medication. Gender is not a factor in this, while the lack of any socioeconomic differences dispels the myth that patients in lower socioeconomic groups are disadvantaged because their caregivers know less.


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