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dc.contributor.authorMcWilliams, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorKinsella, Anthony
dc.contributor.authorO'Callaghan, Eadbhard
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-06T12:04:52Z
dc.date.available2012-09-06T12:04:52Z
dc.date.issued2012-08-02
dc.identifier.citationThe effects of daily weather variables on psychosis admissions to psychiatric hospitals. 2012: Int J Biometeorolen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1432-1254
dc.identifier.pmid22855350
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00484-012-0575-1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/241718
dc.descriptionSeveral studies have noted seasonal variations in admission rates of patients with psychotic illnesses. However, the changeable daily meteorological patterns within seasons have never been examined in any great depth in the context of admission rates. A handful of small studies have posed interesting questions regarding a potential link between psychiatric admission rates and meteorological variables such as environmental temperature (especially heat waves) and sunshine. In this study, we used simple non-parametric testing and more complex ARIMA and time-series regression analysis to examine whether daily meteorological patterns (wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, rainfall, sunshine, sunlight and temperature) exert an influence on admission rates for psychotic disorders across 12 regions in Ireland. Although there were some weak but interesting trends for temperature, barometric pressure and sunshine, the meteorological patterns ultimately did not exert a clinically significant influence over admissions for psychosis. Further analysis is needed.en_GB
dc.description.abstractSeveral studies have noted seasonal variations in admission rates of patients with psychotic illnesses. However, the changeable daily meteorological patterns within seasons have never been examined in any great depth in the context of admission rates. A handful of small studies have posed interesting questions regarding a potential link between psychiatric admission rates and meteorological variables such as environmental temperature (especially heat waves) and sunshine. In this study, we used simple non-parametric testing and more complex ARIMA and time-series regression analysis to examine whether daily meteorological patterns (wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, rainfall, sunshine, sunlight and temperature) exert an influence on admission rates for psychotic disorders across 12 regions in Ireland. Although there were some weak but interesting trends for temperature, barometric pressure and sunshine, the meteorological patterns ultimately did not exert a clinically significant influence over admissions for psychosis. Further analysis is needed.
dc.languageENG
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International journal of biometeorologyen_GB
dc.subjectHOSPITALen_GB
dc.subjectPSYCHIATRIC CAREen_GB
dc.subject.otherPSYCHOSIS ADMISSIONSen_GB
dc.subject.otherWEATHER VARIABLESen_GB
dc.titleThe effects of daily weather variables on psychosis admissions to psychiatric hospitals.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSt John of God Hospital, Stillorgan, Co. Dublin, Ireland, drstevemb@gmail.com.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalInternational journal of biometeorologyen_GB
html.description.abstractSeveral studies have noted seasonal variations in admission rates of patients with psychotic illnesses. However, the changeable daily meteorological patterns within seasons have never been examined in any great depth in the context of admission rates. A handful of small studies have posed interesting questions regarding a potential link between psychiatric admission rates and meteorological variables such as environmental temperature (especially heat waves) and sunshine. In this study, we used simple non-parametric testing and more complex ARIMA and time-series regression analysis to examine whether daily meteorological patterns (wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, rainfall, sunshine, sunlight and temperature) exert an influence on admission rates for psychotic disorders across 12 regions in Ireland. Although there were some weak but interesting trends for temperature, barometric pressure and sunshine, the meteorological patterns ultimately did not exert a clinically significant influence over admissions for psychosis. Further analysis is needed.


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