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dc.contributor.authorPriebe, Stefan
dc.contributor.authorMatanov, Aleksandra
dc.contributor.authorSchor, Ruth
dc.contributor.authorStraßmayr, Christa
dc.contributor.authorBarros, Henrique
dc.contributor.authorBarry, Margaret M
dc.contributor.authorDíaz-Olalla, José M
dc.contributor.authorGabor, Edina
dc.contributor.authorGreacen, Tim
dc.contributor.authorHolcnerová, Petra
dc.contributor.authorKluge, Ulrike
dc.contributor.authorLorant, Vincent
dc.contributor.authorMoskalewicz, Jacek
dc.contributor.authorSchene, Aart H
dc.contributor.authorMacassa, Gloria
dc.contributor.authorGaddini, Andrea
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T15:12:48Z
dc.date.available2012-08-08T15:12:48Z
dc.date.issued2012-03-28
dc.identifier.citationBMC Public Health. 2012 Mar 28;12(1):248
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-12-248
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/237792
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background Socially marginalised groups tend to have higher rates of mental disorders than the general population and can be difficult to engage in health care. Providing mental health care for these groups represents a particular challenge, and evidence on good practice is required. This study explored the experiences and views of experts in 14 European countries regarding mental health care for six socially marginalised groups: long-term unemployed; street sex workers; homeless; refugees/asylum seekers; irregular migrants and members of the travelling communities. Methods Two highly deprived areas were selected in the capital cities of 14 countries, and experts were interviewed for each of the six marginalised groups. Semi-structured interviews with case vignettes were conducted to explore experiences of good practice and analysed using thematic analysis. Results In a total of 154 interviews, four components of good practice were identified across all six groups: a) establishing outreach programmes to identify and engage with individuals with mental disorders; b) facilitating access to services that provide different aspects of health care, including mental health care, and thus reducing the need for further referrals; c) strengthening the collaboration and co-ordination between different services; and d) disseminating information on services both to marginalised groups and to practitioners in the area. Conclusions Experts across Europe hold similar views on what constitutes good practice in mental health care for marginalised groups. Care may be improved through better service organisation, coordination and information.
dc.titleGood practice in mental health care for socially marginalised groups in Europe: a qualitative study of expert views in 14 countries
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.rights.holderStefan Priebe et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
dc.description.statusPeer Reviewed
dc.date.updated2012-08-06T15:01:23Z
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-22T19:41:28Z
html.description.abstractAbstract Background Socially marginalised groups tend to have higher rates of mental disorders than the general population and can be difficult to engage in health care. Providing mental health care for these groups represents a particular challenge, and evidence on good practice is required. This study explored the experiences and views of experts in 14 European countries regarding mental health care for six socially marginalised groups: long-term unemployed; street sex workers; homeless; refugees/asylum seekers; irregular migrants and members of the travelling communities. Methods Two highly deprived areas were selected in the capital cities of 14 countries, and experts were interviewed for each of the six marginalised groups. Semi-structured interviews with case vignettes were conducted to explore experiences of good practice and analysed using thematic analysis. Results In a total of 154 interviews, four components of good practice were identified across all six groups: a) establishing outreach programmes to identify and engage with individuals with mental disorders; b) facilitating access to services that provide different aspects of health care, including mental health care, and thus reducing the need for further referrals; c) strengthening the collaboration and co-ordination between different services; and d) disseminating information on services both to marginalised groups and to practitioners in the area. Conclusions Experts across Europe hold similar views on what constitutes good practice in mental health care for marginalised groups. Care may be improved through better service organisation, coordination and information.


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