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dc.contributor.authorWallace, Elaine
dc.contributor.authorTwomey, Marie
dc.contributor.authorO'Reilly, Maeve
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-23T09:15:54Z
dc.date.available2012-07-23T09:15:54Z
dc.date.issued2012-05-25
dc.identifier.citationChallenges in the Management of Pediatric Central Venous Access Devices in the Community. 2012:notPediatr Hematol Oncolen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1521-0669
dc.identifier.pmid22632142
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/08880018.2012.684135
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/235111
dc.description.abstractCentral venous access devices (CVADs) play an essential role in the care of critically ill children. Significant challenges exist for teams in managing CVADs particularly in a community setting. The authors aimed to assess the experience of general practitioners (GPs) caring for children with CVADs. From 200 CVADs inserted in a pediatric hospital in 2009, 50 patients were randomly selected and 44 GPs were forwarded a questionnaire. Twenty (46%) GPs responded. The main reasons (n = 22) for using CVADs were medication administration (n = 11), nutrition (n = 6), and blood sampling (n = 5). Thirteen (65%) GPs had no education in CVAD management and 14 (70%) were unaware of existing guidelines. Those identified by GPs as having primary responsibility for care of CVADs in the community included hospital/pediatric teams (n = 9), parents (n = 3), GPs (n = 2), public health nurses (n = 1), and palliative care ("home care") teams (n = 1). The main challenges (n = 15) identified by GPs were lack of education (n = 4), line management difficulties (n = 3), infection risk (n = 3), infrequent exposure to CVADs (n = 3), and poor communication (n = 1). GPs felt that these challenges could be addressed through: education (n = 8), increased manpower and community support (n = 1), and improved communication (n = 1). This study highlights the inconsistency and challenges for GPs surrounding CVAD use in children. Further education and support is necessary to assist GPs in their use particularly when providing end-of-life care for children in the community.
dc.languageENG
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Pediatric hematology and oncologyen_GB
dc.titleChallenges in the Management of Pediatric Central Venous Access Devices in the Community.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Palliative Medicine, Our Lady's Hospital for Sick Children , Crumlin, Dublin , Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalPediatric hematology and oncologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
html.description.abstractCentral venous access devices (CVADs) play an essential role in the care of critically ill children. Significant challenges exist for teams in managing CVADs particularly in a community setting. The authors aimed to assess the experience of general practitioners (GPs) caring for children with CVADs. From 200 CVADs inserted in a pediatric hospital in 2009, 50 patients were randomly selected and 44 GPs were forwarded a questionnaire. Twenty (46%) GPs responded. The main reasons (n = 22) for using CVADs were medication administration (n = 11), nutrition (n = 6), and blood sampling (n = 5). Thirteen (65%) GPs had no education in CVAD management and 14 (70%) were unaware of existing guidelines. Those identified by GPs as having primary responsibility for care of CVADs in the community included hospital/pediatric teams (n = 9), parents (n = 3), GPs (n = 2), public health nurses (n = 1), and palliative care ("home care") teams (n = 1). The main challenges (n = 15) identified by GPs were lack of education (n = 4), line management difficulties (n = 3), infection risk (n = 3), infrequent exposure to CVADs (n = 3), and poor communication (n = 1). GPs felt that these challenges could be addressed through: education (n = 8), increased manpower and community support (n = 1), and improved communication (n = 1). This study highlights the inconsistency and challenges for GPs surrounding CVAD use in children. Further education and support is necessary to assist GPs in their use particularly when providing end-of-life care for children in the community.


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