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dc.contributor.authorKelly, M
dc.contributor.authorO'Sullivan, K
dc.contributor.authorFinegan, P
dc.contributor.authorMoran, J
dc.contributor.authorBradley, C
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-01T09:35:20Z
dc.date.available2012-03-01T09:35:20Z
dc.date.issued2011-10
dc.identifier.citationAssisted admissions? A national survey of general practitioner experience of involuntary admissions. 2011, 104 (9):273-5 Ir Med Jen
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102
dc.identifier.pmid22132596
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/213691
dc.description.abstractThe 2001 Mental Health Act introduced in 2006, changed how a patient is admitted involuntarily to a psychiatric unit. This paper reports on a national survey of general practitioners' experience implementing the Act. Five hundred and sixty eight (568) GPs completed the survey. Twenty five percent (25%) of respondants had not used it. When used, twenty four percent (24%) report that it takes seven hours or more to complete an admission. Fifty percent (50%) of respondents are confident to complete the necessary paperwork. Overall GPs are dissatisfied with arrangements for transport of patients (mean Likert score 3.5), primarily due to the time delay. GPs believe this places risk on the patient, family and GP. Only thirty-three percent (33%) of respondents feel that the Mental Health Act has improved the patient, GP and family experience of involuntary admission.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAttitude of Health Personnel
dc.subject.meshCommitment of Mentally Ill
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshGeneral Practitioners
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshIreland
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires
dc.titleAssisted admissions? A national survey of general practitioner experience of involuntary admissions.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMedical Education Unit, Medical School, University College Cork. m.kelly@ucc.ieen
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen
dc.description.provinceMunster
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-22T16:07:37Z
html.description.abstractThe 2001 Mental Health Act introduced in 2006, changed how a patient is admitted involuntarily to a psychiatric unit. This paper reports on a national survey of general practitioners' experience implementing the Act. Five hundred and sixty eight (568) GPs completed the survey. Twenty five percent (25%) of respondants had not used it. When used, twenty four percent (24%) report that it takes seven hours or more to complete an admission. Fifty percent (50%) of respondents are confident to complete the necessary paperwork. Overall GPs are dissatisfied with arrangements for transport of patients (mean Likert score 3.5), primarily due to the time delay. GPs believe this places risk on the patient, family and GP. Only thirty-three percent (33%) of respondents feel that the Mental Health Act has improved the patient, GP and family experience of involuntary admission.


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