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dc.contributor.authorO'Driscoll, D
dc.contributor.authorFitzgerald, E
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:13:37Z
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:13:37Z
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:13:37Z
dc.identifier.citationJ R Coll Surg Edinb. 1999 Jun;44(3):197-9.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0035-8835 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0035-8835 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid10372494en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/209151
dc.description.abstractAn isolated iliac artery aneurysm is where there is aneurysmal dilatation of one or more branches of the iliac system, with no associated dilatation of the aorta. Such aneurysms are rare and comprise 1% of all intra-abdominal aneurysms. The signs and symptoms of such an aneurysm are influenced by its concealed location within the bony pelvis. Awareness of these special characteristics improves the chances of early diagnosis and proper treatment before possible rupture. We present the clinical and radiological features of three such aneurysms. Ultrasound was the first imaging modality to be performed. Ipsilateral hydronephrosis was demonstrated in each case, this lead to imaging the pelvis and the correct diagnosis. We review the clinical and radiological literature and conclude that the pelvis should be imaged in all cases of unexplained hydronephrosis.
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_GB
dc.subject.meshDiagnosis, Differentialen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshHydronephrosis/*complicationsen_GB
dc.subject.meshIliac Aneurysm/*etiology/pathology/ultrasonographyen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.titleIsolated iliac artery aneurysms with associated hydronephrosis.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Radiology, Cork University Hospital, Eire, UK.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburghen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster
html.description.abstractAn isolated iliac artery aneurysm is where there is aneurysmal dilatation of one or more branches of the iliac system, with no associated dilatation of the aorta. Such aneurysms are rare and comprise 1% of all intra-abdominal aneurysms. The signs and symptoms of such an aneurysm are influenced by its concealed location within the bony pelvis. Awareness of these special characteristics improves the chances of early diagnosis and proper treatment before possible rupture. We present the clinical and radiological features of three such aneurysms. Ultrasound was the first imaging modality to be performed. Ipsilateral hydronephrosis was demonstrated in each case, this lead to imaging the pelvis and the correct diagnosis. We review the clinical and radiological literature and conclude that the pelvis should be imaged in all cases of unexplained hydronephrosis.


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