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dc.contributor.authorDeasy, C
dc.contributor.authorRyan, D
dc.contributor.authorO'Donnell, C
dc.contributor.authorCusack, S
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:10:40Z
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:10:40Z
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:10:40Z
dc.identifier.citationIr Med J. 2008 Feb;101(2):44-6.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid18450248en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/209041
dc.description.abstractA rapid response team was instigated in Cork to improve prehospital care and reduce unnecessary Emergency Department (ED) visits. This consisted of a Specialist Registrar (SpR) in Emergency Medicine and a Paramedic who attended all "999" calls in a designated rapid response vehicle on the allotted study days. Two hundred and sixty-three patients were seen on designated days between Jan 2004 and March 2006. Presentations seen included; road traffic accident (23%) collapse (12%), fall (10%) and seizure (8%). The majority of calls were to houses (36%). The most common medical intervention was intravenous cannulation (25%). Intravenous medications were administered in 21% of these patients--morphine sulphate was the most common drug given. It was possible to safely discharge 31% of patients on scene. In our experience skilled Emergency Medicine doctors attending at scene could provide advanced care and reduce ambulance transportation and patient attendance.
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_GB
dc.subject.meshChilden_GB
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Emergency Medical Servicesen_GB
dc.subject.meshEmergency Service, Hospital/*utilizationen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshInfanten_GB
dc.subject.meshIrelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Patient Care Teamen_GB
dc.subject.meshPilot Projectsen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Quality of Health Careen_GB
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_GB
dc.titleThe impact of a pre-hospital medical response unit on patient care and emergency department attendances.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentEmergency Department, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork., conordeasy@hotmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster
html.description.abstractA rapid response team was instigated in Cork to improve prehospital care and reduce unnecessary Emergency Department (ED) visits. This consisted of a Specialist Registrar (SpR) in Emergency Medicine and a Paramedic who attended all "999" calls in a designated rapid response vehicle on the allotted study days. Two hundred and sixty-three patients were seen on designated days between Jan 2004 and March 2006. Presentations seen included; road traffic accident (23%) collapse (12%), fall (10%) and seizure (8%). The majority of calls were to houses (36%). The most common medical intervention was intravenous cannulation (25%). Intravenous medications were administered in 21% of these patients--morphine sulphate was the most common drug given. It was possible to safely discharge 31% of patients on scene. In our experience skilled Emergency Medicine doctors attending at scene could provide advanced care and reduce ambulance transportation and patient attendance.


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