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dc.contributor.authorCoffey, J C
dc.contributor.authorSmith, M J F
dc.contributor.authorWang, J H
dc.contributor.authorBouchier-Hayes, D
dc.contributor.authorCotter, T G
dc.contributor.authorRedmond, H P
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:05:37Z
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:05:37Z
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:05:37Z
dc.identifier.citationBioessays. 2006 Apr;28(4):433-7.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0265-9247 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0265-9247 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid16547958en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/bies.20381en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/208857
dc.description.abstractIn the recent past, several papers have pointed to the possibility that tumour removal generates a permissive environment in which tumour growth is potentiated. This phenomenon has been coined "perioperative tumour growth" and whilst it represents a departure in terms of our attitude to the surgical process, this concept was first hinted at by Paget(1) himself. Despite this, the time interval immediately before and after cancer surgery (i.e. the perioperative period) remains an underutilised interval during which chemotherapeutic regimens are rarely implemented. Herein, we present a summarised review of the literature that supports the concept that tumour removal may potentiate the growth of residual neoplastic disease. We also outline current knowledge regarding underlying mechanisms and in this manner highlight potential therapeutic entry points. Finally, we emphasise the urgent need for trials of agents that could protect patients against the harmful host-tumour interactions that may occur during the perioperative period.
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm, Residual/pathology/surgeryen_GB
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms/*pathology/*surgeryen_GB
dc.subject.meshPostoperative Perioden_GB
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_GB
dc.titleCancer surgery: risks and opportunities.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, Cork University Hospital, University College Cork,, National University of Ireland. calvincoffey@hotmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalBioEssays : news and reviews in molecular, cellular and developmental biologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster
html.description.abstractIn the recent past, several papers have pointed to the possibility that tumour removal generates a permissive environment in which tumour growth is potentiated. This phenomenon has been coined "perioperative tumour growth" and whilst it represents a departure in terms of our attitude to the surgical process, this concept was first hinted at by Paget(1) himself. Despite this, the time interval immediately before and after cancer surgery (i.e. the perioperative period) remains an underutilised interval during which chemotherapeutic regimens are rarely implemented. Herein, we present a summarised review of the literature that supports the concept that tumour removal may potentiate the growth of residual neoplastic disease. We also outline current knowledge regarding underlying mechanisms and in this manner highlight potential therapeutic entry points. Finally, we emphasise the urgent need for trials of agents that could protect patients against the harmful host-tumour interactions that may occur during the perioperative period.


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