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dc.contributor.authorWhite, Patricia
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Susan M
dc.contributor.authorHevey, David
dc.contributor.authorO'Dowd, Thomas
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:49:43Z
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:49:43Z
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:49:43Z
dc.identifier.citationDiabetes Educ. 2009 Sep-Oct;35(5):810-7.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1554-6063 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0145-7217 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid19783768en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0145721709340930en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207906
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between psychological and social factors and diabetes outcomes in people with type 2 diabetes and their family members. METHODS: A total of 153 patients with type 2 diabetes were assessed at a diabetes outpatient clinic and postal questionnaires were sent to nominated family members. The measures examined were diabetes knowledge, social support, well-being, and illness perceptions. RESULTS: When compared with those with diabetes, family members reported lower positive well-being and lower levels of satisfaction with support. They also perceived diabetes as a more cyclical illness, which was controlled more by treatment than by the individual. Family members also reported that the person with diabetes was more emotionally distressed and knew more about diabetes than the patient had actually reported himself or herself. There were no differences between the family members of those in good or poor glycaemic control. CONCLUSIONS: This study reinforces the importance of understanding social context and illness beliefs in diabetes management. It also highlights the potential for including family members in discussions and education about diabetes management.
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*psychologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshFamily/*psychologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshFamily Healthen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practiceen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshQuality of Lifeen_GB
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Social Supporten_GB
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factorsen_GB
dc.titleUnderstanding type 2 diabetes: including the family member's perspective.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Public Health and Primary Care, Trinity College Centre for Health, Sciences, Adelaide and Meath Hospital incorporating the National Children's, Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24, Ireland. pwhite@tcd.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalThe Diabetes educatoren_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster
html.description.abstractPURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between psychological and social factors and diabetes outcomes in people with type 2 diabetes and their family members. METHODS: A total of 153 patients with type 2 diabetes were assessed at a diabetes outpatient clinic and postal questionnaires were sent to nominated family members. The measures examined were diabetes knowledge, social support, well-being, and illness perceptions. RESULTS: When compared with those with diabetes, family members reported lower positive well-being and lower levels of satisfaction with support. They also perceived diabetes as a more cyclical illness, which was controlled more by treatment than by the individual. Family members also reported that the person with diabetes was more emotionally distressed and knew more about diabetes than the patient had actually reported himself or herself. There were no differences between the family members of those in good or poor glycaemic control. CONCLUSIONS: This study reinforces the importance of understanding social context and illness beliefs in diabetes management. It also highlights the potential for including family members in discussions and education about diabetes management.


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