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dc.contributor.authorQuinlan, M Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorCasey, R Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFlynn, Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorGrainger, Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcDermott, T E Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorThornhill, J Aen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:48:43Z
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:48:43Z
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:48:43Z
dc.identifier.citationIr J Med Sci. 2009 Sep;178(3):287-90. Epub 2009 Jun 4.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1863-4362 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0021-1265 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid19495832en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11845-009-0362-0en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207870
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Follow-up of patients with an initial negative prostate biopsy, but surrounding whom a suspicion of prostate cancer persists, is difficult. In addition, debate exists as to the optimal technique for repeat prostate biopsy. AIMS: To assess the cancer detection rate on repeat prostate biopsy. METHODS: We reviewed patients who underwent prostate biopsy in our department in 2005 who had >or=1 previous biopsy within the preceding 5 years. Cancer detection rate on repeat biopsy and the influence of the number of biopsy cores were recorded. RESULTS: Cancer detection rate on repeat biopsy was 15.4%, with approximately 60% detected on the first repeat biopsy, but approximately 10% not confirmed until the fourth repeat biopsy. Gleason score was similar regardless of the time of diagnosis (6.1-6.5). Mean interval between first biopsy and cancer diagnosis (range 18-55 months) depended on the number of repeat procedures. There was an association between the number of biopsy cores and cancer detection. CONCLUSIONS: This study supports the practice of increasing the number of cores taken on initial and first repeat biopsy to maximise prostate cancer detection and reduce the overall number of biopsies needed.
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_GB
dc.subject.meshBiopsyen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshProstate/*pathologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshProstate-Specific Antigenen_GB
dc.subject.meshProstatic Neoplasms/*diagnosis/pathology/surgeryen_GB
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Transurethral Resection of Prostateen_GB
dc.titleA review of repeat prostate biopsies and the influence of technique on cancer detection: our experience.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Urology, The Adelaide and Meath Hospital incorporating the National, Children's Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish journal of medical scienceen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster
html.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Follow-up of patients with an initial negative prostate biopsy, but surrounding whom a suspicion of prostate cancer persists, is difficult. In addition, debate exists as to the optimal technique for repeat prostate biopsy. AIMS: To assess the cancer detection rate on repeat prostate biopsy. METHODS: We reviewed patients who underwent prostate biopsy in our department in 2005 who had >or=1 previous biopsy within the preceding 5 years. Cancer detection rate on repeat biopsy and the influence of the number of biopsy cores were recorded. RESULTS: Cancer detection rate on repeat biopsy was 15.4%, with approximately 60% detected on the first repeat biopsy, but approximately 10% not confirmed until the fourth repeat biopsy. Gleason score was similar regardless of the time of diagnosis (6.1-6.5). Mean interval between first biopsy and cancer diagnosis (range 18-55 months) depended on the number of repeat procedures. There was an association between the number of biopsy cores and cancer detection. CONCLUSIONS: This study supports the practice of increasing the number of cores taken on initial and first repeat biopsy to maximise prostate cancer detection and reduce the overall number of biopsies needed.


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