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dc.contributor.authorCasey, Rowan G
dc.contributor.authorGrainger, Ronald
dc.contributor.authorButler, Michael R
dc.contributor.authorMcDermott, Thomas E
dc.contributor.authorThornhill, John A
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:48:40Z
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:48:40Z
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:48:40Z
dc.identifier.citationUrology. 2010 Oct;76(4):915-8. Epub 2010 May 14.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1527-9995 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0090-4295 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid20471670en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.urology.2010.03.022en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207868
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: Delay in treatment of testis cancer (TC) has a proven negative impact on disease stage, treatment outcome, and mortality. Poor public awareness of the disease and lack of testis self-examination (TSE) may account for late presentation. The aim of this study was to examine the knowledge of TC and performance of TSE in a group of men over 2 time periods 20 years apart. METHODS: In the current study, 677 men from a banking institution were surveyed on their knowledge of TC and their performance of TSE. Comparisons were made from the current data and those from the original study in 1986. RESULTS: This study demonstrates an increase in public awareness and modest concomitant increase in TSE since first studied in this country in 1986. There was no difference in knowledge across age groups in this study. Furthermore, men who demonstrate a superior degree of knowledge were more likely to perform TSE. Limitations included possible selection bias in the 2 studies conducted in a banking institution. CONCLUSIONS: Increased testicular cancer knowledge combined with TSE may have a role in improving detection of significant testicular pathology.
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practiceen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIrelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshPilot Projectsen_GB
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_GB
dc.subject.meshSelf-Examination/*trends/utilizationen_GB
dc.subject.meshTesticular Neoplasms/diagnosis/etiology/*psychologyen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Testisen_GB
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_GB
dc.titlePublic awareness of testis cancer and the prevalence of testicular self-examination-changing patterns over 20 years.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentAdelaide and Meath Hospital Dublin, Incorporating the National Children's, Hospital, (AMNCH), Tallaght, Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalUrologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster
html.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: Delay in treatment of testis cancer (TC) has a proven negative impact on disease stage, treatment outcome, and mortality. Poor public awareness of the disease and lack of testis self-examination (TSE) may account for late presentation. The aim of this study was to examine the knowledge of TC and performance of TSE in a group of men over 2 time periods 20 years apart. METHODS: In the current study, 677 men from a banking institution were surveyed on their knowledge of TC and their performance of TSE. Comparisons were made from the current data and those from the original study in 1986. RESULTS: This study demonstrates an increase in public awareness and modest concomitant increase in TSE since first studied in this country in 1986. There was no difference in knowledge across age groups in this study. Furthermore, men who demonstrate a superior degree of knowledge were more likely to perform TSE. Limitations included possible selection bias in the 2 studies conducted in a banking institution. CONCLUSIONS: Increased testicular cancer knowledge combined with TSE may have a role in improving detection of significant testicular pathology.


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