Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRidge, Carole A
dc.contributor.authorMcDermott, Shaunagh
dc.contributor.authorFreyne, Bridget J
dc.contributor.authorBrennan, Donal J
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Conor D
dc.contributor.authorSkehan, Stephen J
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:32:43Z
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:32:43Z
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:32:43Z
dc.identifier.citationAJR Am J Roentgenol. 2009 Nov;193(5):1223-7.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1546-3141 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0361-803X (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid19843734en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.2214/AJR.09.2360en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207607
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to retrospectively compare the diagnostic adequacy of lung scintigraphy with that of pulmonary CT angiography (CTA) in the care of pregnant patients with suspected pulmonary embolism. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patient characteristics, radiology report content, additional imaging performed, final diagnosis, and diagnostic adequacy were recorded for pregnant patients consecutively referred for lung scintigraphy or pulmonary CTA according to physician preference. Measurements of pulmonary arterial enhancement were performed on all pulmonary CTA images of pregnant patients. Lung scintigraphy and pulmonary CTA studies deemed inadequate for diagnosis at the time of image acquisition were further assessed, and the cause of diagnostic inadequacy was determined. The relative contribution of the inferior vena cava to the right side of the heart was measured on nondiagnostic CTA images and compared with that on CTA images of age-matched nonpregnant women, who were the controls. RESULTS: Twenty-eight pulmonary CTA examinations were performed on 25 pregnant patients, and 25 lung scintigraphic studies were performed on 25 pregnant patients. Lung scintigraphy was more frequently adequate for diagnosis than was pulmonary CTA (4% vs 35.7%) (p = 0.0058). Pulmonary CTA had a higher diagnostic inadequacy rate among pregnant than nonpregnant women (35.7% vs 2.1%) (p < 0.001). Transient interruption of contrast material by unopacified blood from the inferior vena cava was identified in eight of 10 nondiagnostic pulmonary CTA studies. CONCLUSION: We found that lung scintigraphy was more reliable than pulmonary CTA in pregnant patients. Transient interruption of contrast material by unopacified blood from the inferior vena cava is a common finding at pulmonary CTA of pregnant patients.
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshChi-Square Distributionen_GB
dc.subject.meshContrast Mediaen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshImage Interpretation, Computer-Assisteden_GB
dc.subject.meshIopamidol/diagnostic useen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen_GB
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular/*radiography/*radionuclide imagingen_GB
dc.subject.meshPulmonary Embolism/*radiography/*radionuclide imagingen_GB
dc.subject.meshRadiopharmaceuticals/diagnostic useen_GB
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshTechnetium Tc 99m Aggregated Albumin/diagnostic useen_GB
dc.subject.meshTomography, X-Ray Computed/*methodsen_GB
dc.titlePulmonary embolism in pregnancy: comparison of pulmonary CT angiography and lung scintigraphy.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Radiology, St Vincent's University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4,, Ireland. caroleridge@hotmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalAJR. American journal of roentgenologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster
html.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to retrospectively compare the diagnostic adequacy of lung scintigraphy with that of pulmonary CT angiography (CTA) in the care of pregnant patients with suspected pulmonary embolism. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patient characteristics, radiology report content, additional imaging performed, final diagnosis, and diagnostic adequacy were recorded for pregnant patients consecutively referred for lung scintigraphy or pulmonary CTA according to physician preference. Measurements of pulmonary arterial enhancement were performed on all pulmonary CTA images of pregnant patients. Lung scintigraphy and pulmonary CTA studies deemed inadequate for diagnosis at the time of image acquisition were further assessed, and the cause of diagnostic inadequacy was determined. The relative contribution of the inferior vena cava to the right side of the heart was measured on nondiagnostic CTA images and compared with that on CTA images of age-matched nonpregnant women, who were the controls. RESULTS: Twenty-eight pulmonary CTA examinations were performed on 25 pregnant patients, and 25 lung scintigraphic studies were performed on 25 pregnant patients. Lung scintigraphy was more frequently adequate for diagnosis than was pulmonary CTA (4% vs 35.7%) (p = 0.0058). Pulmonary CTA had a higher diagnostic inadequacy rate among pregnant than nonpregnant women (35.7% vs 2.1%) (p < 0.001). Transient interruption of contrast material by unopacified blood from the inferior vena cava was identified in eight of 10 nondiagnostic pulmonary CTA studies. CONCLUSION: We found that lung scintigraphy was more reliable than pulmonary CTA in pregnant patients. Transient interruption of contrast material by unopacified blood from the inferior vena cava is a common finding at pulmonary CTA of pregnant patients.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record