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dc.contributor.authorO'Grady, M J
dc.contributor.authorCody, D
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:24:24Z
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:24:24Z
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:24:24Z
dc.identifier.citationArch Dis Child. 2011 Mar;96(3):280-4. Epub 2010 Apr 22.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1468-2044 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0003-9888 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid20413616en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/adc.2009.181800en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207414
dc.description.abstractSubclinical hypothyroidism (SH) is defined as an elevated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in association with a normal total or free thyroxine (T4) or triiodothyronine (T3). It is frequently encountered in both neonatology and general paediatric practice; however, its clinical significance is widely debated. Currently there is no broad consensus on the investigation and treatment of these patients; specifically who to treat and what cut-off level of TSH should be used. This paper reviews the available evidence regarding investigation, treatments and outcomes reported for childhood SH.
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshChilden_GB
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_GB
dc.subject.meshDown Syndrome/complicationsen_GB
dc.subject.meshGenetic Predisposition to Diseaseen_GB
dc.subject.meshHormone Replacement Therapy/methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshHypothyroidism/*diagnosis/drug therapy/etiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshInfanten_GB
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_GB
dc.subject.meshThyrotropin/blooden_GB
dc.subject.meshThyroxine/therapeutic useen_GB
dc.titleSubclinical hypothyroidism in childhood.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Our Ladys Childrens Hospital, Crumlin, , Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalArchives of disease in childhooden_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster
html.description.abstractSubclinical hypothyroidism (SH) is defined as an elevated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in association with a normal total or free thyroxine (T4) or triiodothyronine (T3). It is frequently encountered in both neonatology and general paediatric practice; however, its clinical significance is widely debated. Currently there is no broad consensus on the investigation and treatment of these patients; specifically who to treat and what cut-off level of TSH should be used. This paper reviews the available evidence regarding investigation, treatments and outcomes reported for childhood SH.


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