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dc.contributor.authorO Brien, F J
dc.contributor.authorJairam, S D
dc.contributor.authorTraynor, C A
dc.contributor.authorKennedy, C M
dc.contributor.authorPower, M
dc.contributor.authorDenton, M D
dc.contributor.authorMagee, C
dc.contributor.authorConlon, P J
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:02:21Z
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:02:21Z
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:02:21Z
dc.identifier.citationIr J Med Sci. 2011 Mar;180(1):135-8. Epub 2010 Oct 20.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1863-4362 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0021-1265 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid20960237en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11845-010-0617-9en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207223
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: H1N1 influenza A, was first described in April 2009. A significant cohort of patients from this outbreak developed acute respiratory distress syndrome or pneumonia. H1N1 has since been transmitted across the world. Little has been described on the renal complications of this illness. METHODS: A retrospective review of all patients admitted to our institution with H1N1 infection was carried out from July to November 2009. Renal biochemistry, need for renal replacement therapy and hospital outcome was recorded. RESULTS: Thirty-four patients with H1N1 were admitted. Average length of admission was 10 days (3-84). Eleven patients (32%) developed acute kidney injury (AKI) as defined by the RIFLE criteria (creatinine range 120-610). Four patients required renal replacement therapy, for a range of 10-52 days. Seven patients developed AKI that responded to volume resuscitation. The commonest cause of AKI was sepsis with acute tubular necrosis. CONCLUSION: This study highlights the significance and frequency of renal complications associated with this illness.
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAcute Kidney Injury/*etiology/therapy/virologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtypeen_GB
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human/*complicationsen_GB
dc.subject.meshIrelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshMultiple Organ Failureen_GB
dc.subject.meshRenal Replacement Therapyen_GB
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_GB
dc.titlePandemic H1N1 (2009) and renal failure: the experience of the Irish national tertiary referral centre.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Nephrology, Beaumont Hospital, Beaumont Road, Dublin 9, Ireland., Frankjobrien@physicians.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish journal of medical scienceen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster
html.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: H1N1 influenza A, was first described in April 2009. A significant cohort of patients from this outbreak developed acute respiratory distress syndrome or pneumonia. H1N1 has since been transmitted across the world. Little has been described on the renal complications of this illness. METHODS: A retrospective review of all patients admitted to our institution with H1N1 infection was carried out from July to November 2009. Renal biochemistry, need for renal replacement therapy and hospital outcome was recorded. RESULTS: Thirty-four patients with H1N1 were admitted. Average length of admission was 10 days (3-84). Eleven patients (32%) developed acute kidney injury (AKI) as defined by the RIFLE criteria (creatinine range 120-610). Four patients required renal replacement therapy, for a range of 10-52 days. Seven patients developed AKI that responded to volume resuscitation. The commonest cause of AKI was sepsis with acute tubular necrosis. CONCLUSION: This study highlights the significance and frequency of renal complications associated with this illness.


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