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dc.contributor.authorCurran, C
dc.contributor.authorHenry, C
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, K A
dc.contributor.authorCotter, P E
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-31T16:39:47Z
dc.date.available2012-01-31T16:39:47Z
dc.date.issued2012-01-31T16:39:47Z
dc.identifier.citationIr J Med Sci. 2011 Jun;180(2):401-5. Epub 2011 Feb 6.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1863-4362 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0021-1265 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid21298491en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11845-011-0686-4en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/206353
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: A requirement of an effective acute stroke service is the early arrival of patients to the hospital emergency department (ED). This will allow the possible use of thrombolytic therapy or other acute interventions within a limited time window. AIMS: We investigated the predictors of early arrival in a single hospital serving a mixed urban and rural catchment area. METHODS: A retrospective review of all case notes for 1 year was performed. RESULTS: Of 105 acute strokes, 91 were cerebral infarcts and a total of 71 cases presenting initially to the ED had timing available for analysis. 39.4% presented within 3 h, and 12.7% were potentially suitable for thrombolysis. Those living closer to the hospital were not more likely to arrive within 3 h (Z = -0.411, p = 0.68). Presenting directly to the hospital by emergency services (or private transport) was significantly associated with early arrival in a univariate comparison (p < 0.001), and in a multivariate model. CONCLUSION: The only independent predictor of early arrival to the ED is direct presentation. Improved public education of the importance of recognition of stroke symptoms and rapid contact with the emergency services will improve the early attendance following acute stroke, allowing increased use of acute stroke treatments.
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAcute Diseaseen_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_GB
dc.subject.meshBrain Ischemia/*diagnosis/*drug therapyen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Emergency Service, Hospitalen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHealth Services Accessibilityen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Transportation of Patientsen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of early arrival at the emergency department in acute ischaemic stroke.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Geriatric Medicine, Mercy University Hospital, Cork, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish journal of medical scienceen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster
html.description.abstractBACKGROUND: A requirement of an effective acute stroke service is the early arrival of patients to the hospital emergency department (ED). This will allow the possible use of thrombolytic therapy or other acute interventions within a limited time window. AIMS: We investigated the predictors of early arrival in a single hospital serving a mixed urban and rural catchment area. METHODS: A retrospective review of all case notes for 1 year was performed. RESULTS: Of 105 acute strokes, 91 were cerebral infarcts and a total of 71 cases presenting initially to the ED had timing available for analysis. 39.4% presented within 3 h, and 12.7% were potentially suitable for thrombolysis. Those living closer to the hospital were not more likely to arrive within 3 h (Z = -0.411, p = 0.68). Presenting directly to the hospital by emergency services (or private transport) was significantly associated with early arrival in a univariate comparison (p < 0.001), and in a multivariate model. CONCLUSION: The only independent predictor of early arrival to the ED is direct presentation. Improved public education of the importance of recognition of stroke symptoms and rapid contact with the emergency services will improve the early attendance following acute stroke, allowing increased use of acute stroke treatments.


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