Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSugrue, Michael
dc.contributor.authorBuhkari, Yasir
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-31T16:31:34Z
dc.date.available2012-01-31T16:31:34Z
dc.date.issued2012-01-31T16:31:34Z
dc.identifier.citationWorld J Surg. 2009 Jun;33(6):1123-7.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1432-2323 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0364-2313 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid19404708en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00268-009-0040-4en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/205730
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) is a harbinger of intra-abdominal mischief, and its measurement is cheap, simple to perform, and reproducible. Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH), especially grades 3 and 4 (IAP > 18 mmHg), occurs in over a third of patients and is associated with an increase in intra-abdominal sepsis, bleeding, renal failure, and death. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Increased IAP reading may provide an objective bedside stimulus for surgeons to expedite diagnostic and therapeutic work-up of critically ill patients. One of the greatest challenges surgeons and intensivists face worldwide is lack of recognition of the known association between IAH, ACS, and intra-abdominal sepsis. This lack of awareness of IAH and its progression to ACS may delay timely intervention and contribute to excessive patient resuscitation. CONCLUSIONS: All patients entering the intensive care unit (ICU) after emergency general surgery or massive fluid resuscitation should have an IAP measurement performed every 6 h. Each ICU should have guidelines relating to techniques of IAP measurement and an algorithm for management of IAH.
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Abdominal Cavity/blood supplyen_GB
dc.subject.meshAcute Diseaseen_GB
dc.subject.meshCompartment Syndromes/etiology/physiopathology/*therapyen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshHydrostatic Pressureen_GB
dc.subject.meshMonitoring, Physiologic/methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_GB
dc.titleIntra-abdominal pressure and abdominal compartment syndrome in acute general surgery.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, Letterkenny General Hospital and Galway University, Hospitals, Letterkenny, Donegal, Ireland. acstrauma@hotmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalWorld journal of surgeryen_GB
dc.description.provinceUlster
html.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) is a harbinger of intra-abdominal mischief, and its measurement is cheap, simple to perform, and reproducible. Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH), especially grades 3 and 4 (IAP > 18 mmHg), occurs in over a third of patients and is associated with an increase in intra-abdominal sepsis, bleeding, renal failure, and death. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Increased IAP reading may provide an objective bedside stimulus for surgeons to expedite diagnostic and therapeutic work-up of critically ill patients. One of the greatest challenges surgeons and intensivists face worldwide is lack of recognition of the known association between IAH, ACS, and intra-abdominal sepsis. This lack of awareness of IAH and its progression to ACS may delay timely intervention and contribute to excessive patient resuscitation. CONCLUSIONS: All patients entering the intensive care unit (ICU) after emergency general surgery or massive fluid resuscitation should have an IAP measurement performed every 6 h. Each ICU should have guidelines relating to techniques of IAP measurement and an algorithm for management of IAH.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record