• The changing face of informed surgical consent.

      Oosthuizen, J C; Burns, P; Timon, C; Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, The Royal Victoria Eye and Ear Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. C.Oosth@gmail.com (2012-03)
      To determine whether procedure-specific brochures improve patients' pre-operative knowledge, to determine the amount of information expected by patients during the consenting process, and to determine whether the recently proposed 'Request for Treatment' consenting process is viable on a large scale.
    • The effect of gastric decompression on postoperative nausea and emesis in pediatric, tonsillectomy patients.

      Chukudebelu, O; Leonard, D S; Healy, A; McCoy, D; Charles, D; Hone, S; Rafferty, M; Department of Otolaryngology, Royal Victoria Eye and Ear Hospital, Adelaide Road,, Dublin 2, Ireland. BBChukud@yahoo.com (2012-02-01)
    • Oncogenic impact of human papilloma virus in head and neck cancer.

      Heffernan, C B; O'Neill, J P; Timon, C; The Royal Victoria Eye and Ear Hospital, Adelaide Road, Dublin, Ireland., Heffernan_colleen@hotmail.com (2012-02-01)
      There is considerable debate within the literature about the significance of human papilloma virus in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and its potential influence on the prevention, diagnosis, grading, treatment and prognosis of these cancers. Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption have traditionally been cited as the main risk factors for head and neck cancers. However, human papilloma virus, normally associated with cervical and other genital carcinomas, has emerged as a possible key aetiological factor in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, especially oropharyngeal cancers. These cancers pose a significant financial burden on health resources and are increasing in incidence. The recent introduction of vaccines targeted against human papilloma virus types 16 and 18, to prevent cervical cancer, has highlighted the need for ongoing research into the importance of human papilloma virus in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
    • Selective fine needle aspiration of parotid masses. FNA should be performed in all patients older than 60 years.

      Kieran, S M; McKusker, M; Keogh, I; Timon, C; Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Royal Victoria Eye and Ear, Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. skieran@rcsi.ie (2012-02-01)
      OBJECTIVES: The exact role of fine needle aspiration in the pre-operative assessment of patients presenting with parotid masses is controversial. Some surgeons propose that fine needle aspiration be performed only selectively in those patients with likely malignant disease, whilst others recommend it for all patients presenting with such a mass. Intuitively, one would expect older patients to be more likely to suffer from primary malignant parotid tumours and secondary deposits of malignant skin tumours. Therefore, we hypothesised that older patients with a parotid mass should undergo fine needle aspiration regardless of their medical history. DESIGN: We retrospectively reviewed 197 consecutive parotidectomies to test this hypothesis. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty-one patients (61.4 per cent) were diagnosed with benign disease, whilst 76 (38.6 per cent) were diagnosed with malignant disease. Eighty-three per cent of patients aged 60 years or younger had benign disease, as opposed to 35.6 per cent of patients aged more than 60 years. Malignant disease occurred more commonly in patients older than 60 years (odds ratio 8.962, 95 per cent confidence interval 4.607-17.434). CONCLUSION: In patients with a parotid mass, fine needle aspiration should be performed on all those aged 60 years or older.
    • "Tarantula keratitis": a case report.

      McAnena, L; Murphy, C; O'Connor, J; Royal Victoria Eye and Ear Hospital (RVEEH), Adelaide Road, Dublin 2, Ireland. lmcanena@yahoo.co.uk (2013-09)
      A case of an 11-year-old boy presenting with a two-week history of a red, irritated right eye after handling a Chilean Rose Tarantula at an exotic pet exhibition. Examination revealed innumerable microscopic hairs embedded at all levels of the cornea. He was commenced on steroid drops with subjective and objective improvement at follow up.