• Family planning and inflammatory bowel disease: the patient and the practitioner.

      Toomey, Desmond; Waldron, Brian; Department of Surgery, Kerry General Hospital Tralee, Co Kerry, Ireland. toomey.des@gmail.com (2013-02)
      Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are commonly in their child-bearing years. Maintainance medication, as recommended by international guidelines, is an emotive topic and an anxiety source. This study measures the awareness of patients and primary practitioners of the issues involved.
    • Gastric cancer-related information on the Internet: incomplete, poorly accessible, and overly commercial.

      Killeen, Shane; Hennessey, Arthur; El Hassan, Yahear; Killeen, Kelvin; Clarke, Nick; Murray, Kevin; Waldron, Brian; Department of Surgery, Kerry General Hospital, Tralee, Co. Kerry, Ireland. sdfkilleen@eircom.net (2011-02)
      Internet gastric cancer information is overtly commercial, generally incomplete, and poorly accessible.
    • Medical students views on selection tools for Medical School - a mixed methods study

      Stevens, L; Kelly, ME; Hennessy, M; Last, J; Dunne, F; O’Flynn, S (Irish Medical Journal (IMJ), 2014-09)
      It is important to ensure that the tools used in Medical School selection are acceptable to students and applicants. A questionnaire was administered to year 1 medical students in 2010 to determine the suitability of a variety of selection tools and the acceptability of HPAT-Ireland in particular. There were 291 respondents a 77% response rate representing approximately one third of all school leaver entrants that year. While the majority 285( 98%) were in favour of using school leaving examinations there was also support for the use of interviews 215 (74%) and other tools. Three quarters of Irish respondents 159 (76%) agreed that HPAT-Ireland is a fair test overall however section 3 (non-verbal reasoning) appeared lees acceptable and relevant than other sections. A little over half had taken a preparatory HPAT -Ireland course 112 (54%).
    • Refocusing acute psychiatry, performance management, standards and accountability, a new context for mental health nursing.

      Harnett, P J; Bowles, N; Coughlan, A; Kerry Community Services, Kerry General Hospital, Rathass, Tralee, Co. Kerry, Ireland. pj.harnett@hse.ie (2009-06)
      The term 'performance management' has an aversive 'managerial' aspect, is unappealing to many public sector staff and has an 'image problem'. Perhaps as a consequence, it has failed to make a significant impact on Irish public sector workers, notably mental health nurses. In this paper, performance management is introduced and examined within an Irish healthcare context and with reference to its use in other countries. Some of the challenges faced by Irish mental health nurses and the potential benefits of working within a performance managed workplace are discussed. The paper concludes that performance management is likely to increasingly affect nurses, either as active agents or as passive recipients of a change that is thrust on them. The authors anticipate that the performance management 'image problem' will give way to recognition that this is a fundamental change which has the potential to enable health services to change. This change will bring high standards of transparency, worker involvement in decision making, an explicit value base for health services and individual teams. It provides the potential for clear practice standards and high standards of transparency as well as worker welfare in all aspects, including supporting employment and career progression.
    • Severe hemorrhage from a hypodermoclysis site.

      O'Hanlon, Shane; Sheahan, Patricia; McEneaney, Robert; Kerry General Hospital, Tralee, Co Kerry, Ireland. sohanlon@gmail.com (2012-01-31)
      Hypodermoclysis, or subcutaneous infusion of fluids, is an alternative means of administration of fluid. It is sometimes used in older patients in whom there is difficulty achieving intravenous access, or who are entering the terminal stage. It is considered a relatively low-risk procedure. We report a case where a patient's death may have resulted from its use.
    • Tolerance of colonoscopy and questioning its utility in the elderly population

      Rathore, F; Sultan, N; Byrne, D (Irish Medical Journal, 2014-09)
      This study was carried out from Jan ’12-Dec ’12 to assess current practice in Kerry General Hospital against the age related indicators for colonoscopies. A total of 1474 colonoscopies were performed,1177 (79.9%) were diagnostic and 297 (20.1%) were therapeutic, patients were divided into 4 age groups under 75, 75-80, 81-85, 86+. The trend analysis revealed an increase in diagnostic colonoscopies and decrease in therapeutic colonoscopies with age. 664 (45.04%) of colonoscopies were reported normal which made up the majority of the total diagnoses, 1330 (90.2%) of colonoscopies occurred without any complications. Main complications were patient discomfort being the highest, present in 112 (7.6%) of patients, and lowest being urticaria around the IV site present in 1 (0.1%) of the cases. Patient discomfort was higher in younger patients as evidenced by 98 cases aged <75, followed by 11 cases aged 75-80, 2 cases aged 81-85 and 1 case aged >86. Highest percentage of poor tolerance was found in 14 (1.1%) of total patients <75, 1 (0.8%) of total patients aged 75-80, 1(1.7%) of total patients in age group 81-85 and none (0%) in age group >86. We have established the safety of colonoscopy, low rate of complications and a better tolerance in the elderly from this study, however, its utility, especially in presence of other comorbidities in elderly is questionable.